Season 2 has a soap opera flair


Michael Rainey Jr. as Tariq St. Patrick in Power Book II: Ghost

Michael Rainey Jr. as Tariq St. Patrick in Power Book II: Ghost
Photo: Starz

Seven years ago, viewers discovered Tariq St. Patrick (Michael Rainey Jr.), the 12-year-old son of drug lord James “Ghost” St. Patrick and his wife Tasha St. Patrick. , in Power. Throughout the six seasons of the series created by Courtney Kemp, Tariq has transformed from a precocious young tween to a grown man whose grim, calculating demeanor is more like his father’s than he ever wanted. admit it. Now in Book of Power II: Ghost, which picks up directly after the events of the original series, Tariq makes perfect sense.

The first season of the spin-off chronicled Tariq’s life in the days and weeks following his father’s murder. Determined to live up to the terms of his father’s will, Tariq enrolled at prestigious Stansfield University to graduate. However, while his mother was on trial for his father’s murder, he found himself following in Ghost’s footsteps as a means of financial freedom.

While the first season of Power Book: Ghost dealt with the power of the family, the second concerned ethics. The series picks up where the first season ended. Tariq’s quiet life as a student is about to explode in his face. After murdering his teacher, Jabari Reynolds (Justin McManus), who had tried to blackmail him, Tariq and Cane Tejada (Woody McClain), the eldest son of drug queen Monet Tejada (Mary J. Blige), attempt to keep their names on inquiry. This time, however, Tariq is trying to escape the law without his mother’s wise advice.

For those who enter the Power universe, nothing about the second season of Power Book II: Ghost will make sense. At its core, the series is a soap opera with plots that have been in the works for years. He follows a student in unlikely situations and the adults around him whose lives are just as shifted. For better or worse, the narrative and the characters are overkill.

Tariq’s boss, Monet, is fighting for control of his business with her incarcerated husband, Lorenzo (Berto Colon). Their children, Diana (LaToya Tonodeo), Dru (Lovell Adams-Gray), and Cane all try to figure out who they are without becoming collateral in their parents’ war. Despite being squeezed out of his inner family at the end of last season, Cane seems determined to make a comeback, with the help of brand new drug distributor Mecca (Daniel Sunjata). On the other hand, Diana and Dru have their own aspirations, which have nothing to do with the family business let alone follow their mother’s oppressive orders.

The Tejadas aren’t the only ones going through transformation this season. Tariq’s best friend and business partner, Brayden Westen (Gianni Paolo), seeks to break up with his blue-blooded Upper East Side family. Yet money and whiteness are more powerful than he thinks. Meanwhile, disgraced city councilor Rashad Tate (Larenz Tate) is looking for a way to get back to the headlines after his failed gubernatorial bid. A new role at Stansfield could be his ticket back into the limelight. Attorney Cooper Saxe (Shane Johnson) has teamed up with Davis McClain (Clifford “Method Man” Smith), who has underhanded reasons for welcoming the former prosecutor into his criminal defense business.

The season premiere episode, “Free Will Ain’t Free,” feels a bit like a circus, with screaming horror movie-like music playing in the background whenever something insecure brews. This opening episode is all about catching up with old characters and introducing new ones to viewers. Tariq’s academic, romantic and professional life is in ruins. Another source of stress for the student is his unfinished business with his grandmother (Debbi Morgan) and younger sister. In addition, the constant police activity on campus makes it difficult for Tariq and Brayden to continue their drug trafficking as usual.

Mary J. Blige as Monet Tejada in Power Book II: Ghost

Mary J. Blige as Monet Tejada in Power Book II: Ghost
Photo: Starz

Episode two, “Selfless Acts”, seems a bit more settled than the first. The campy music is gone and all the character motivations for this season are much clearer. However, Power Book II: Ghost fans know from past episodes of the show and entire seasons of its predecessor that things can get rushed. Lauren (Paige Hurd) seems to be fed up with Tariq’s omissions and suspicious behavior, which could open the door to his potential romance with Diana. Some shocking aspects of Monet’s past come to light. And finally, Professor Carrie Milgram (Melanie Liburd) appears as the number one suspect in Jabari’s murder.

The Power Book II: Ghost the cast is so vast that the varying levels of acting talent are immediately apparent. Some plots are much more intriguing than others; Rainey’s transformation from a bratty teenager to a manipulative young man is intriguing to watch. This season includes several stars. Tonodo spreads her wings as Diana, a seemingly sweet young woman who is more than ready to navigate life on her own terms. Chicago Med Jeff Hephner has joined the cast as Detective Kevin Whitman, who is determined to figure out what happened to Jabari, and he’s not shy about letting his personal feelings interfere with his judgment. Finally, the Mecca of Sunjata gives the fan favorite Power villainous Felipe Lobos (Enrique Murciano) a run for his money. The different characters and plots will undoubtedly keep fans coming back week after week.

For those looking for an entry point into the Power Universe, this season of Ghost is not the way to go. If you haven’t watched the first season or any of the Power, it’s going to feel convoluted, quick, and almost unruly, especially compared to its higher, nuanced counterpart: the ’90s prequel series, Power Book III: Raising Kanan. But for fans who have made it to this point in the universe, drama, dangerous storylines, and manipulative characters are a dime a dozen this season. Yes Power Book II: Ghost is anything, it’s consistent.

Kemp finished Power because she had no more stories for James St. Patrick. By allowing Tariq to navigate her own world, she gave many loved and hated characters the opportunity for fans to praise and despise them over and over again. To this end, Power Book II: Ghost This is precisely what you would expect: lots of drama, wacky storylines, a ton of different absurd key players, questionable choices, but also a bit of fun.


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