Book sale – Naxos Audiobooks http://naxos-audiobooks.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 22:32:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-100x100.png Book sale – Naxos Audiobooks http://naxos-audiobooks.com/ 32 32 Rowe draws large crowd for family breakfast and book fair https://naxos-audiobooks.com/rowe-draws-large-crowd-for-family-breakfast-and-book-fair/ Wed, 11 May 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/rowe-draws-large-crowd-for-family-breakfast-and-book-fair/ Lyly-Anne Small (left) and Bella Woodard, both kindergartners at Guy E. Rowe Elementary School in Norway, were able to enjoy a morning at school with their families at the Donuts for Grownups breakfast and at the spring book fair. Last Friday marked the first school event in more than two years. Nicole Carter / Democrat […]]]>

Lyly-Anne Small (left) and Bella Woodard, both kindergartners at Guy E. Rowe Elementary School in Norway, were able to enjoy a morning at school with their families at the Donuts for Grownups breakfast and at the spring book fair. Last Friday marked the first school event in more than two years. Nicole Carter / Democrat announcerNORWAY — Guy E. Rowe Elementary School in Norway relaunched its annual student-parent breakfast last week, Donuts for Grownups, for the first time since 2019, with 1,500 people in attendance.

“We have a full house,” said principal Douglas Kilmister, as the children led their parents between the cafeteria and the school gymnasium, where a book fair was taking place. “There was no seating, which is damn good.

“We have 410 students and maybe over 1,000 parents here today. There are a lot of people I’ve never met. Many dads have been able to do this.

“It’s kind of our first big deal in two years,” said Holly Hill, who teaches first grade at Rowe. served here this morning.

“We knew that if we hadn’t been able to organize an event in two years, it would probably be a big problem. We decided to stagger it so that not everyone arrives at eight o’clock.”

Ruby Melhus, a first-grader at Guy E. Rowe Elementary School in Norway, shows off the new books she bought at the school’s spring breakfast and book fair. Nicole Carter / Democrat announcer

The book fair was sponsored by Scholastics, which provided fiction and non-fiction books for all ages, from chalkboard and picture to chapter books. Normally held in the fall during parent-teacher conferences and in the spring before Mother’s Day, proceeds from book sales are donated to Rowe’s Educators-Community-Home Organization.

Hill’s students brought their collections of new books back to her freshman class to get their first reads right away.

Mia Knightly had three Elephant and Piggie books from a series for young readers by Mo Willems. Ruby Melhus, 7, was settling down with one of her new books, the graphic novel Bunbun and Bonbon.

“The school was full of adults!” Student Luke Gaudette said, adding that he ate a cinnamon donut with his family for breakfast.

“Opening the school for the first time in two and a half years, I think people were really looking forward to coming back and celebrating with their kids,” Hill said.

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Mixture of marble and modernity in this Portland mansion for sale at $2.8 million https://naxos-audiobooks.com/mixture-of-marble-and-modernity-in-this-portland-mansion-for-sale-at-2-8-million/ Sun, 08 May 2022 21:53:00 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/mixture-of-marble-and-modernity-in-this-portland-mansion-for-sale-at-2-8-million/ From the street, a sleek, two-story Portland Height House features dramatic matte black walls in front of towering vertical cedar boxes. Interrupting the rectangular mass, tall windows offer no clue as to what’s inside. Open the front door concealed by stone walls to discover a structure full of surprises: a gold leaf ceiling and Venetian […]]]>

From the street, a sleek, two-story Portland Height House features dramatic matte black walls in front of towering vertical cedar boxes. Interrupting the rectangular mass, tall windows offer no clue as to what’s inside.

Open the front door concealed by stone walls to discover a structure full of surprises: a gold leaf ceiling and Venetian plaster walls mixed with brass railings and crocodile-textured wallpaper.

“Furniture can be minimalistic or moody,” explains Elliott Moore of Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty, which listed the custom home on 0.69 acres at 2808 Patton Way Southwest on sale for $2,799,999.

Moore likens the fusion of classic and modern — like crystal chandeliers and leather-wrapped light fixtures — to the mod-glam style championed by the Los Angeles designer Kelly Wearstlerwhose colorful and playful pastiche interiors are theatrical and widely admired.

Wearstler, the fashionable judge on Bravo’s “Top Design” competition, written in his fourth book, “Rhapsody“, that the mix of antiques, vintage and contemporary furniture and art leads to a more “moving” interior.

The spaces in the Portland Heights home share Wearstler’s bold approach to merging textures and time periods.

Here, surfaces covered in Italian marble go beyond the stair treads. The same white marble with dark veins covers the kitchen countertops, island top and sides, and the butler’s pantry backsplashes, range hood and sink. The master suite has a marble vanity and tub walls.

Step out through a glass back door to a covered patio with white marble flooring and treetop views.

The home, built in 2011, has four bedrooms, three bathrooms, a powder room and 4,350 square feet of living space, which includes a guest bedroom with a private entrance.

The workshop, attached to the six-car garage, could be converted into a home theater, Moore says.

— Janet Eastman | 503-294-4072

jeastman@oregonian.com | @janeteastman

Learn about the Portland and Oregon real estate market:

• Newlywed Bruce Springsteen partied at this Oregon house for sale

• Architect John Storrs’ mid-century modern home for sale in Hillsdale’s legendary ‘Storrs Quadrant’

• Mid-Century Modern Architecture House Tour and Book Fair supports Oregon’s preservation work

• Mid-Century Modern architect William Fletcher’s first Portland home is up for sale for the first time

• Three levels, big views, seven deals in one week: Portland architect’s home for sale for the first time

• Buy mansions in Boring, where there is “more for the price”

• Two Pearl District townhouses in the old train station are for sale, starting at $1,575,000

• Oregon’s “Terrible Tilly” lighthouse on a private island for sale for $6.5 million

• Portland’s huge mansions for sale: what kind of homes with space can you get for $8 million or less?

• Oregon’s best-known baker, Ken Forkish, is selling a southwest Portland home with a bread oven

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Today in Johnson City History: May 7 | Alive https://naxos-audiobooks.com/today-in-johnson-city-history-may-7-alive/ Sat, 07 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/today-in-johnson-city-history-may-7-alive/ May 7, 1922: A century ago today, The Sunday Chronicle informed readers of a tragedy that had happened the day before. “Committed to marriage and happy that the next day he would be wheeled by her side, William G. Byrd, lineman for the Tennessee Eastern Electric Company (sic), was hurled into eternity yesterday , while […]]]>

May 7, 1922: A century ago today, The Sunday Chronicle informed readers of a tragedy that had happened the day before. “Committed to marriage and happy that the next day he would be wheeled by her side, William G. Byrd, lineman for the Tennessee Eastern Electric Company (sic), was hurled into eternity yesterday , while completing his last task in Johnson City, being killed instantly when he accidentally clamped a high voltage wire. Death occurred hours after he was due to catch the train to Maryville where he was to to marry today. Instead, the same train carried her fiancé the lifeless clay of the one who was to be her husband.

“William Byrd performed his task yesterday morning with willing hands and a light heart. He had just informed the executives of the Tennessee Eastern Electric Company that he had obtained a job in Maryville, in an aluminum company and that he would finish his work here on Saturday afternoon and return to his old home.

“He was a young man of twenty-five, and he readily confessed to his work companions that he received a letter from his fiancée every day; that they had to get married “immediately,” and that his return home—his and hers—after the end of the working day, was that the wedding could take place. The position which he had obtained there, so to speak, was that which he had occupied before, and there he and his wife were to establish themselves.

“His job here yesterday morning, the last day he was hooked up with the local business before he started claiming his fiancée and starting his new job, was running a wire from the ‘lead’ wire over the poles, in a building theatre. He was on the pole, the job was almost done. His foot touched a thick wire, as he clutched a telephone cable overhead – that invisible flash of a pent-up thunderbolt snapped the thread of his life in the blink of an eye, his soul rushed to the shores of eternity, to wait through the years those who then awaited her, and only the silent clay in the form of this morning’s bridegroom, made the journey home – and home .

“The accident happened at the rear of the Liberty Theater building between Roan Street (sic) and the railway tracks while Byrd and Sam Johnson were running a cable through the theater to run a motor.”

“Byrd had climbed the pole with the steel clinchers used by linemen attached to his legs, and it is said that with one leg thrown over the crossbeam he caught a telephone cable running just above the pole, but not attached to it, and at the same time touched one of the 2300 volt lead wires with his foot, completing the circuit, since the telephone cable is grounded with holding wires.

“The metal climber on his foot is believed to have touched the high voltage wire. He was brought to the ground by other linemen, who scaled the pole and lowered the body with ropes, after power was cut at the power station.

“Witnesses say that after receiving the shock, Byrd held on arm crossed with his legs until he was lowered, which took about four or five minutes. Ambulances arrived at the scene quickly and the pulmotor was applied, to no effect.Drs. Randall, Wallace and Matthews arrived within moments and Byrd was pronounced dead.

“The body was picked up by local undertakers and shipped to Maryville on the #25 South train yesterday afternoon.”

The Sunday Chronicle was published as the Johnson City Chronicle on other weekdays.

May 7, 1947: Seventy-five years ago today, the Johnson City Press-Chronicle reported: “Plans for the Jersey Heifer Show to be held here June 20 will be discussed at a meeting of the agricultural committee and Jersey stockmen of the upstate region, scheduled for 3 p.m. Thursday at the Chamber of Commerce office at the Johnson (sic) Sevier Hotel, RR Jackson, chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, announced yesterday.

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“More than 50 animals from some of the best Jersey herds in the state will be on display, a spokesperson said.”

“The show was originally scheduled for Chattanooga, but due to the buying power of that end of the state, it was changed to Johnson City.”

May 7, 1956: The Johnson City Press-Chronicle aimed to start its readers’ day with a laugh. Under “Today’s Chuckle”, readers read: “Young steno to boss: ‘Well, if you can’t give me a raise, why not give me the same pay more often?’ »

May 7, 1961: In masthead headlines, the Johnson City Press-Chronicle reminded readers: “Municipal election set for Tuesday; Your vote counts.

May 7, 1972: Fifty years ago today, in an article with an Elizabethton deadline, the Johnson City Press-Chronicle informed readers that “A variety of spring wildflowers must bloom and be ready for the county wildflower tour of Carter on Friday and Saturday”.

“The Carter County Chamber of Commerce urges that reservations for the Traditional Dinner at 6:30 p.m. Friday at the American Legion Building be made without delay. The deadline for accepting reservations is Thursday at 5 p.m. .

“Ralph Steadman and William H. Wallace, Kingsport, will present a selection of color slides at the dinner.”

“Participants on the Saturday morning tour of Roan Mountain Forests near the Twin-Springs Recreation Area are asked to meet at the Lynnwood Hotel on Elk Avenue at 8 a.m.”

May 7, 1997: Twenty-five years ago today, the Johnson City Press reported news with a Deadline from Elizabethton. “A book sale scheduled for today at Sycamore Shoals Hospital has been postponed.”

“According to a hospital announcement, a truck transporting the books to Elizabethton had an accident.”

“The sale will be postponed to a later date.”

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Sacramento’s A-1 Comics buys $600,000 comic book collection https://naxos-audiobooks.com/sacramentos-a-1-comics-buys-600000-comic-book-collection/ Thu, 05 May 2022 21:39:00 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/sacramentos-a-1-comics-buys-600000-comic-book-collection/ A-1 Comics says the “Winters Collection” stood out because it contains an entire Marvel Comics series from 1961 to 1990. SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A-1 BD purchased a comic book collection containing over 60 years of comic books collected directly from newsstands by one person. The company buys collections of all sizes and values ​​daily, but […]]]>

A-1 Comics says the “Winters Collection” stood out because it contains an entire Marvel Comics series from 1961 to 1990.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A-1 BD purchased a comic book collection containing over 60 years of comic books collected directly from newsstands by one person.

The company buys collections of all sizes and values ​​daily, but owner Lanvin Peets, son of A-1 Comics founders Brian and Rosemary Peets, said the store’s most recent purchase stands out from the rest because it contains a complete Marvel Comics. performed from 1961 to 1990.

According to A-1 Comics, the “Winters Collection,” which was purchased for $600,000, includes more than 35,000 comics and memorabilia ranging from toys, magazines, framed posters and original 1930s artwork. at the beginning of the 2000’s.

Peets says the collection contains complete sets of all comic book titles featuring icons such as Spider-Man, X-Men, Iron Man, Thor, The Hulk, Doctor Strange and more.

“This is the largest collection we’ve ever purchased and the most we’ve ever spent on an individual collection,” Peets said. “This type of purchase usually happens once in a lifetime and it was a real treat to be able to walk through it all in its entirety with my dad right next to me.”

On June 1, 2022, the “Winters Collection” will be available from A-1 Comics in Sacramento. Peets says the day the collection hits their Sacramento store, they’ll also be hosting a instagram live at 5 p.m. to give customers across the country the opportunity to purchase comics from the collection. After June 1, the company will attend various comic book shows and conventions where it will sell and show different items from the collection.

I just made a video with some highlights of the great collection we bought, check it out! https://youtu.be/TVlssI0gvzU

posted by A-1 Comics, Inc. on Tuesday, April 26, 2022

With over 33 years in business, A-1 Comics has become Sacramento’s largest comic book retailer with locations in Sacramento, Folsom and Roseville. Before opening their doors to customers for this special collection, they also plan to celebrate comics in general. On Saturday May 7, A-1 Comics participates in Free comic day at each of their three locations and at their “A-1 warehouse” in Sacramento. The event features comic book cosplayers, signing and sketching with Ron Lim, and other miscellaneous offerings.

Free Comic Book Day is one of the biggest selling days of the year for us and our stores,” said Wes Smith of A-1 Comics. “It’s a great, money-saving event for people of all ages.”

Celebrate FREE COMIC DAY with us this Saturday, MAY 7! With Ron Lim from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Dedication and…

posted by A-1 Comics, Inc. on Tuesday, May 3, 2022

For more information on A-1 BD, visit website or instagram.

Watch more from ABC10: Meet the people behind one of Sacramento’s longest running family restaurants, El Novillero

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Personal Finance Books: How to Maximize the Benefits of Reading Them https://naxos-audiobooks.com/personal-finance-books-how-to-maximize-the-benefits-of-reading-them/ Thu, 05 May 2022 03:55:07 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/?p=2724 Don’t let unfamiliar terms or a lack of time deter you from reading important financial management books. Consider the following scenario: You’ve visited a bookshop or a library.  You’ve discovered a fantastic personal finance book that speaks directly to your financial situation. You’re eager to read it, yet it’s still sitting on your nightstand. You’re […]]]>

Don’t let unfamiliar terms or a lack of time deter you from reading important financial management books. Consider the following scenario: You’ve visited a bookshop or a library. 

You’ve discovered a fantastic personal finance book that speaks directly to your financial situation. You’re eager to read it, yet it’s still sitting on your nightstand. You’re a little hesitant to take it. 

It appears to be dense with information, and it will push you to modify certain items you’re not sure you want to change. The truth is that a book on your nightstand isn’t going to motivate you to make any changes in your life. Reading a good book, thinking about its concepts, and putting some of them into practice in your life adds value to it.

Here are six steps to help you get the most out of your new personal finance book According to of Bridge Payday.

Read a few pages at a time before putting the book down. 

Today’s attention spans are shorter than ever, making long reading sessions challenging for many people. You’ll begin flipping between pages rather than reading the text. It’s much easier to read a book in small bite-sized bits and then set it aside for later. 

Take a look at that strategy. Rather than reading in one long block, read in five-minute or 10-minute increments a few times a day. After reading a brief part, set it aside. 

You’ll never be bored or overwhelmed this way. This isn’t a race, so keep that in mind.

Stop and reread the previous few paragraphs if you’re still confused. 

Don’t worry if you realize you don’t fully comprehend the financial ideas outlined in the book. This does not imply that you will never comprehend the text. It simply implies the book is introducing a new concept, which you’ll comprehend if you go back and read it again. Take a step back and go over the last few pages again. You’ll see that the concept becomes clearer. 

If it still doesn’t feel right, go back and read that part.

Look up any terminology you’re not familiar with. 

You may come across a phrase that the author expects you to understand, such as a specific type of investment plan, but which you may not. If you don’t know what a word or phrase means, stop reading and check it up right now. Many strange terms can be quickly clarified with a quick internet search, allowing you to return to the text with much less confusion.

Keep a notebook and a pen handy. 

Stop and grab that notebook and pen that’s handy whenever you read something that makes you think or that you want to work on later. Write down that concept or task in your own words. 

Don’t copy it straight from the book, and if you do, add your own comments afterward. The thought will stick in your head if you translate it into your own words and write it down.

Make a list of action items that you will follow. 

If the part you just read clearly guides you to one or more actions you should take, jot them down as if they were items on a to-do list. It’s a good idea to make it stand out from the rest of your notes in some way, such as by including a large check box at the start of the assignment. 

You’ll be able to quickly see which items on your list require action if you do it this way.

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Opinion: Time to explore summer at JCPL https://naxos-audiobooks.com/opinion-time-to-explore-summer-at-jcpl/ Wed, 04 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/opinion-time-to-explore-summer-at-jcpl/ Staten The weather is warming up, the school year is ending, and you’re looking for fun activities to do all summer long. Johnson County Public Library offers its annual Explore Summer program where you can read, create and discover new things on your own, with friends or family. The program is sponsored by the Friends […]]]>

The weather is warming up, the school year is ending, and you’re looking for fun activities to do all summer long. Johnson County Public Library offers its annual Explore Summer program where you can read, create and discover new things on your own, with friends or family.

The program is sponsored by the Friends of JCPL and runs from May 16 to July 31. Explore Summer is open to all ages. Stop by a library branch to register or register online at PageAfterPage.org/ExploreSummer. You will receive a coupon for a free book at a Friends of JCPL book sale, an activity log to track your reading minutes, and a garden sign. JCPL’s Prize Patrol will be searching for street signs while we’re on the road this summer to deliver prizes to your doorstep.

Learning and reading throughout the summer is key to developing early literacy skills and addressing learning loss. Our goal as a community is to read three million minutes together. To help us achieve this goal, we want you to read 10 hours this summer – this can include magazines, books, audiobooks or even the newspaper. Keep track of your time, and when you hit that mark, you’ll receive a finisher prize and be entered to win the grand prize. This year we are offering a stay at the Indianapolis Bottleworks District. It includes gift cards for the restaurants at Garage Food Hall, Living Room Theaters, and the Pins Mechanical Company, as well as a gas gift card so you can get there.

Weekly learning activities let you get out and explore Johnson County, whether it’s public art on the Great Arts Quest, visiting one of our Storywalks, or gazing at the stars with a telescope borrowed from our Library of Things.

The JCPL librarians have some fabulous programs planned for you this summer. Hedgehog Hannah will be there with 12 different animals for an interactive experience. Children’s book character The Green Crayon will meet and greet customers at all of our branches. Random Fandom is back to celebrate pop culture and geeky fandoms. Crafting for a Cause partners with local nonprofits. And Sub Zero Ice Cream will celebrate the end of summer with a STEAM presentation and an ice cream party. To see all activities and register for programs, visit PageAfterPage.org/events.

Get ready to head to a JCPL branch on May 16 to sign up and start reading, venturing, and exploring all that JCPL has to offer this summer. We will see you soon in your favorite JCPL agency!

Kelly Staten is the Johnson County Public Library’s Program Manager. JCPL staff members write this bi-monthly column for the Daily Journal. Send feedback to [email protected]

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Calgary book drive to help sexually exploited women https://naxos-audiobooks.com/calgary-book-drive-to-help-sexually-exploited-women/ Tue, 03 May 2022 01:06:25 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/calgary-book-drive-to-help-sexually-exploited-women/ Breadcrumb Links News Local News RESET Society of Calgary’s Annual Used Book Sale Kicks Off May 11 at Crossroads Market FILE PHOTO: Hundreds of thousands of books on display at the 17th annual book sale in support of the RESET Society on Wednesday, May 1, 2019. Brendan Miller/Postmedia Content of the article A Calgary nonprofit […]]]>

RESET Society of Calgary’s Annual Used Book Sale Kicks Off May 11 at Crossroads Market

Content of the article

A Calgary nonprofit collects as many books as possible in hopes of raising money to help women escape sexual exploitation and trafficking.

The RESET Society of Calgary is gearing up for its annual book drive and sale at Crossroads Market for the first time since 2019, after the COVID-19 pandemic put fundraising on hold for the past two years.

With nearly one million books to be sorted and sold by volunteers, the event is the largest of its kind in Western Canada and the organization hopes to raise $150,000 to support its services during the sale of five days.

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Content of the article

Among the thousands of boxes, shelves and stacks of books that will be sold, there is always something special for collectors to unearth, said Theresa Jenkins, executive director of RESET. Although she didn’t have time to leaf through all the old books piling up at Crossroads, she said a box of centuries-old books caught her eye.

“They are all from Britain and they are all first editions. They are all written in French; . . . some of them date back to the 1800s; it is a complete set of these books. I don’t know what the value would be, but it’s pretty unique,” ​​she said.

While the organization has been able to maintain operations throughout the pandemic thanks to government COVID relief funding, fundraising this year is more important than ever – especially with these funding streams drying up in large party and that COVID is impacting the portfolios of some donors. The book drive is RESET’s largest organizational fundraiser, providing approximately 12% of the group’s annual funding.

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Content of the article

“Twelve percent has a big impact on programming, if we didn’t have those funds,” Jenkins said.

And at a time when the waiting list for the organization’s services has never been longer, this funding has never been more needed.

“(These are) women who are not safe. . . They need a place to go now. It could be a matter of life and death if they don’t attend a safe program or place. The pandemic has really impacted everything,” she said.

The collection of books at Crossroads Market will remain open until May 8, with the sale scheduled for May 11-15.

For more information about RESET and collecting books, visit resetcalgary.ca.

mrodriguez@postmedia.com

Twitter: @michaelrdrguez

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Roundup: Badass Bagels, Train Trees, Badass Book… https://naxos-audiobooks.com/roundup-badass-bagels-train-trees-badass-book/ Sun, 01 May 2022 18:00:45 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/roundup-badass-bagels-train-trees-badass-book/ Popup Bagels did the New York Times. This means they will be harder to catch than ever. But it’s not the only local bagel maker that’s stepped up a gear. Sugar and olives are also tough. Their Badass Bagels line – that’s the name – just signed a deal with belly of gold. The website […]]]>

Popup Bagels did the New York Times. This means they will be harder to catch than ever.

But it’s not the only local bagel maker that’s stepped up a gear. Sugar and olives are also tough.

Their Badass Bagels line – that’s the name – just signed a deal with belly of gold. The website showcases the best food in the country and ships overnight. The page is not live yet, but it will soon display a variety of offers.

They will also sell 3,000 bagels at the Smorgasburg every Sunday in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, starting in early June. It is one of the best and most selective food markets in the country.

But you don’t have to schlep all the way there. Many satisfied customers – business and personal – right here rave about the 100% sourdough recipe. (Okay, technically Sugar & Olives is a few yards from the border in Norwalk. So sue me.)

They also sell at the Westport Farmers’ Market and Double L Market. Outside of Westport, they’re at the Kitchen Table in Pound Ridge, a few other farmers’ markets, the Granola Bar in Greenwich, and the Old Yew in the West Village.

The bagel company took over much of Sugar & Olives. There are no more meals in person. But Jennifer Balin and her wonderful team offer seasonal prepared meals, which can be picked up by customers with their bagels. Click here for more details.

Some Badass Bagels.

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Like many Westporters, Joey Kaempfer was appalled by the recent clearcut at Westport station. It was a security project, according to Eversource and Metro-North.

“We need to raise funds to replace them,” says Kaempfer – a 1966 Staples High School graduate, who is building a house nearby.

He’s willing to donate $5,000 for the seed. But, he says, “a serious group needs to raise the balance – probably $95,000.” They must also obtain permission to plant the new trees, of course.

Is it doable? Are groups or individuals interested? Click “Comments” below.

Recent removal of trees (and overhead wires) at Westport station. (Photo/Matthew Mandell)

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Many books (and LPs, CDs, DVDs, etc.) are still available for the Westport Library book sale.

Plus one that’s absolutely, positively one hell of a book.

(Photo/Frank Bruce)

Today (Sunday, May 1, 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.) all items are half price. Tomorrow (Monday, May 2, 9 a.m. to noon), you can fill a bag for $5 or purchase individual items for half price.

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The Wakeman Town Farm Old-Time Pancake Breakfast fundraiser will not take place until Saturday, June 18 (9 a.m. to noon). But people are already signing up for a time slot.

The menu includes crepes and sausages with all the fixins, as well as coffee and orange juice. It’s outdoors, so kids can wander around to greet the alpacas, sheep, and goats.

The price is $13 per adult, $5 per child 2 years and older. Money raised will help renovate the aging red barn, providing space for classes and programs. Click here record.

Wakeman Town Farm Barn. (Photo/Amy Schneider)

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Want to learn more about the little known but amazing gem known as Smith Richardson Wildlife Preserve?

Aspetuck Land Trust partner, Connecticut Audubon Land Steward Charlie Stebbins will host a “Walk and Talk” this Thursday (May 5, 10 a.m.), at the Sasco Creek Road site at the Southport border.

He will describe the remarkable transformation from an overgrown weedy nest to a haven for nesting birds (and bees). All are welcome – and like the reserve, it’s free.

Charlie Stebbins

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This swan in a swirling pool is perfect for a spring Sunday – and for our “Westport…Naturally” feature.

(Photo/Becky Keeler)

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And finally… today is May Day – aka “May Day”. It is a traditional festival in many European cultures, with dances, songs and cakes.

“Mayday” – one word – is an international distress signal. But that has nothing to do with the month. It is an anglicized version of “help me” – French for “help me!”

There is another way to call for help: “SOS!” It means “Save our souls”. It became popular when Morse code was new: 3 dots, 3 dashes, 3 dots.

Which, in a roundabout way, brings us to today’s song:

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10 Best Things to Do in Boston This Weekend: April 28-May 1, 2022 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/10-best-things-to-do-in-boston-this-weekend-april-28-may-1-2022/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 01:10:38 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/10-best-things-to-do-in-boston-this-weekend-april-28-may-1-2022/ Events BosTen is your weekly guide to the best and coolest happenings in and around Boston. Somerville Open Studios. Somerville Open Studios. This week’s BosTen features a mix of in-person and virtual things to do in Boston this weekend. Do you have an idea of ​​what we should cover? Leave us a comment on this […]]]>

Events

BosTen is your weekly guide to the best and coolest happenings in and around Boston.

Somerville Open Studios. Somerville Open Studios.

This week’s BosTen features a mix of in-person and virtual things to do in Boston this weekend. Do you have an idea of ​​what we should cover? Leave us a comment on this article or in the BoTen Facebook groupor email us at [email protected].

Set your sights on four Independent Film Festival venues

The 19th edition Boston Independent Film Festival (IFFB) is really spreading its wings this time around, with screenings of over 60 films in four theaters in four different cities. Until May 4, adventurous moviegoers can see narrative films and documentaries, in features and shorts, at the Somerville Theater (Somerville), Brattle Theater (Cambridge), Coolidge Corner Theater (Brookline), and CitySpace (Boston). ). As always, the fare will range from those with commercial inclinations to those who are definitely borderline. One of many highlights is the evening’s closing film “Marcel, the shell with shoes”, an animated mockumentary about a small shell (yes, who wears shoes), voiced by Jenny Slate , a native of Milton, who is trying to find her parents after they go missing. The rumor on this one is that it’s lovely but might make you cry a little. For a full list of titles and events, visit the IFF Boston website. —Ed Symkus

Get a free banned book and celebrate diverse voices in literature

This Thursday, the local association BookTalk, Inc.. joins Boston Honors College at the University of Massachusetts to host a Forbidden Book Fair, with the goal of highlighting diverse voices in literature. The event will showcase books by marginalized authors who have been the target of book bans across the countryas “Hood Feminism” by Mikki Kendall, “Grown” by Tiffany Jacksonand Aiden Thomas’ “Graveyard”. Students attending the event, which will take place in the backyard of University Hall and Campus Center at UMass Boston from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., will be able to browse the books on display and choose one to take home. , free. costs. —Dialyn Dwyer

Witness the return of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater to Boston

The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater began with a performance of modern dance by a group of young black dancers led by Alvin Ailey in New York City in 1958. Since then the company has performed for approximately 25 million people at shows across the world. This spring’s performance at the Wang Theater starting this Thursday marks the company’s first return to Boston since the pandemic began. Attendees can expect a host of new and classic works during their shows, alongside the company’s signature Revelationscreated by Ailey from his memories of the Deep South, with blues and gospel influences. — Natalie Gale

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    Find more things to do on Boston.com’s new calendar 📅

Relax with piano folk from The Weather Station

It was a year after completing the “Ignorance” album that Tamara Linderman, the mastermind behind The Weather Station, decided to record another album, this one switching almost completely to solo piano. Released this year, “How Is It That I Should Look at the Stars” was recorded between March 10 and 12, 2020, according to Fourchette, a time when the world began to shut down as COVID-19 became a global pandemic. In March of last year, the band livestreamed a performance from Revolution Recording Studios in Toronto. The band performed all 10 tracks from “Ignorance” during the show. For those fascinated by the latest album, they can watch Linderman perform as The Weather Station at Crystal Ballroom this Thursday. —Arianna MacNeill

Admire the blooming art of the MFA

For the first time since 2019, the National Gallery’s annual Flower Festival will return in person this Thursday. the Blooming art The weekend-long event showcases all things flower to celebrate the return of spring with guest speakers, events, shopping and loads of fresh flower arrangements. Fifty New England floral designers will create stunning floral arrangements and interpretations in the museum’s galleries. The Art in Bloom market in the courtyard will feature goods from 10 vendors for sale, as well as the garden cart, with home and garden items like teacups filled with fresh flowers. Free guided tours of the flower arrangements will be available with admission to the museum all weekend. — Natalie Gale

Visit the SoWa Open Market

Starting Sunday, SoWa Open Market is back every weekend until October. More than a hundred vendors head to Harrison Avenue in the South End, along with a dozen of Boston’s favorite food trucks. The market even sets up a beer garden and live musical entertainment. SoWa Open Market is part farmer’s market, part arts market, part food festival. Local farmers and food vendors line up to sell fresh produce, animal products, baked goods and other goodies, while performers sell jewelry, clothing, home decor home and handmade ceramics. The SoWa Art + Design District also includes a plethora of artist galleries and the SoWa Vintage Market, an indoor flea market filled with second-hand goods. You’ll also find boutiques, design showrooms, tons of surrounding restaurants, and rotating exhibits at the Power plant. This summer, you can discover Beyond King Tut From July 8 to September 18. — Natalie Gale

Watch zombies come to life at Cabot

Those who thoughtlessly reject the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame do so for one or a combination of three reasons: 1) it ignored their personal favorite artists, 2) it recognized artists who got their start after rock ‘n’ ‘roll has stopped meeting Homer Simpson’s definition of perfection, or 3) it has inducted artists whose sound is not exclusively composed of electric guitar, bass guitar, drums and keyboards/synths employed in an acceptable manner. Longtime members of 1960s psychedelic pop group The Zombies, however, were on the moon when they won selection in 2019. Despite their late induction, the group has had a plethora of high-profile admirers over the years, from Tom Petty to Dave Grohl and Eminem. Fans can expect to hear hits like “She’s Not There,” “Tell Her No” and more at Cabot this Friday at 8 p.m. —Blake Maddux

See art on the go at Somerville Open Studios

Somerville will honor its vibrant art scene this weekend, as hundreds of artists from more than 80 of the city’s studios showcase their work at the annual Somerville Open Studios from noon to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Walk down a street you’ve never walked to find art you never dreamed of or, for a more structured approach, take the free trolley supplied by the city to some of the major studios. —Kevin Slane

Chinatown celebrates World Tai Chi Day

Just down the iconic Chinatown Gate, students and instructors from the Bow Sim Mark Tai Chi Association come together to perform the sweeping flow of gentle Tai chi in a free, public celebration of World Tai Chi Day. Tai Chi this Saturday at 10 a.m. Bow Sim Mark Tai Chi Arts and the Rose Kennedy Greenway team up for a 90-minute performance of not only tai chi, but a variety of other Chinese martial arts including qigong, xing yi, bagua , weapon forms and much more. While the annual event has promoted the disciplines in 80 countries and several hundred cities since 1999, this local gathering also celebrates the legacy of Grandmaster Mark, who Black belt magazine once named one of the most influential martial artists of the 20th century. —Cheryl Fenton

Watch baseball meet rock ‘n’ roll at Hot Stove Cool Music

For the first time since going live due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the annual “Hot Stove Cool Music” concert to benefit the Foundation to be named later finally returns to the stage this Saturday at Paradise Rock Club. This year’s show features Good Goo Dolls frontman Johnny Rzeznik, as well as a lineup that includes appearances from FTBNL co-founder and former Red Sox vice-president and general manager Theo Epstein and Baseball Hall of Fame reporter Peter Gammons with the Boston All-Stars. Also on the shortlist are Boston Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck’s band French Lick, Letters to Cleo singer Kay Hanley with all-star Band of Their Own, former Yankees outfielder and jazz guitarist Bernie Williams and former Red Sox pitcher Bronson Arroyo. —Chris Gavin

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]]> Book sales return to Camden Library’s Blue Door Book Shed – Knox County VillageSoup https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-sales-return-to-camden-librarys-blue-door-book-shed-knox-county-villagesoup/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 18:44:37 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-sales-return-to-camden-librarys-blue-door-book-shed-knox-county-villagesoup/ For the first time since the pandemic began, the Camden Public Library will hold a book sale in its Blue Door Book Shed. The sale will take place from Friday May 13 to Sunday May 15 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the ‘Camden is Blooming’ weekend. The Blue Door Book Shed is located […]]]>

For the first time since the pandemic began, the Camden Public Library will hold a book sale in its Blue Door Book Shed. The sale will take place from Friday May 13 to Sunday May 15 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the ‘Camden is Blooming’ weekend. The Blue Door Book Shed is located next to the “Meadow Parking Lot”, just past the Camden Amphitheater.

The sale will feature books for all ages and tastes, and tables will be replenished regularly to ensure there is always a full selection to choose from.

The tables at the Camden Public Library Book Sale will be regularly replenished.

The library has received significant donations of new and old books over the past few months, and these new donations will be featured in the sale. Shoppers will find fiction books, a collection of titles for children and young adults; as well as a range of non-fiction, classified in numerous categories. There will also be a selection of puzzles and DVDs for sale.

Book sales like this generate significant revenue for the Camden Public Library. During the last fiscal year, book sales contributed over $35,000 to the library’s operating budget. This could not be done without the support of the community by donating books to the library and buying books and other offers during sales.

Biographies at the Camden Public Library book sale.

The Camden Public Library will be accepting donations of beautiful, well-maintained books of any age and for any age (please no books with mold or mildew) at the Book Shed on Tuesdays between 9 a.m. and noon throughout the year. Call the library for more information at 236-3440 or visit librarycamden.org.

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