Book review – Naxos Audiobooks http://naxos-audiobooks.com/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 18:54:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-100x100.png Book review – Naxos Audiobooks http://naxos-audiobooks.com/ 32 32 The only constant | Book Review – How to Change: The Science of Getting From Where You Are to Where You Want to Be By Katy Milkman https://naxos-audiobooks.com/the-only-constant-book-review-how-to-change-the-science-of-getting-from-where-you-are-to-where-you-want-to-be-by-katy-milkman/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 18:45:00 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/the-only-constant-book-review-how-to-change-the-science-of-getting-from-where-you-are-to-where-you-want-to-be-by-katy-milkman/ Change is something we always fear and therefore prefer the status quo. It can come from rudimentary things like exercising regularly or saving for the future. Although these goals seem logical and quite simple, they are difficult to follow. This is the heart of Katy Milkman’s book, How to change, where she tells us how […]]]>

Change is something we always fear and therefore prefer the status quo. It can come from rudimentary things like exercising regularly or saving for the future. Although these goals seem logical and quite simple, they are difficult to follow. This is the heart of Katy Milkman’s book, How to change, where she tells us how to overcome the obstacles that stand in our way to achieve these rather simple goals.

The book is based on simple principles of psychology, which the author combines with his experience with businesses as well as experiences. Companies, for example, offer several facilities as well as health schedules to keep employees in good shape. This could be not only gymnasiums, but also provisions for vaccine injections. Yet the response is never encouraging. So what are the issues here? She gives seven obstacles that must be overcome in order for us to achieve our goals. To start, it is important to start. How to get out of the routine and start a new diet or savings life? Often, we make New Year’s resolutions, which is a “date” from which we decide to turn a new page. It can also be his birthday or the crossing of an age threshold. It can happen when something affects you or your family and the latest can be Covid where one can suddenly become health conscious and start doing the right thing. A London Underground strike caused a drastic change in several lives as people walked more and it became a habit.

One obstacle we can all identify with is procrastination, as we prefer the present to the future. By deferring the present to the future, we buy time, but at some point it becomes too late to change when our monetary situation is weak or our health fails irrevocably. She gives the example of a locked savings account that requires saving. It’s more like the provident fund we have, which is forced saving whether we like it or not.

Another obstacle that we all encounter is forgetfulness, which afflicts us at different times. The author recommends making a written plan preferably and following it so as not to collapse despite our intentions. This is what we observe in elections where people commit to a party but “collapse” at the critical moment, which often disturbs the calculations. Therefore, she recommends breaking the plans into small chunks sequentially to follow them piecemeal, which is easier to stick to.

The tendency to follow the path of least resistance is an obstacle to change. Doctors normally follow standard procedure and never really think about further examination before giving medication. Therefore, often during the outbreak, doctors suspect Covid and put the patient on a drug regimen which may not be necessary. The so-called standard operating practice that is now a habit makes it an easy decision but has costs.

Milkman gives the example of a public hospital in the United States where doctors blindly prescribed drugs that weren’t even needed. When asked, they admitted that they could have reduced the dose or given cheaper alternatives that would have saved the healthcare system a lot of money.

In this way, the author overcomes all the obstacles that prevent us from becoming resistant to change and urges readers to make a real attempt. A simple experiment was conducted in a hotel where half of the staff had their blood pressure and other health parameters monitored daily after being informed. The other half was not. Those who were told their health was being monitored tended to become more conscious in their attempt to stay healthy through diet and walks compared to those who were not told. Therefore, small signals like these can make the difference.

Peer pressure, for example, is another technique that can be used to bring about change. Seeing other people exercising in your apartment complex or co-workers eating healthy meals can also be a change. One of his experiments consisted of informing the inhabitants of a locality each month about the electricity consumption of all households. As long as people saw these numbers, they tended to save. Once that was stopped, people went back to their old ways.

The author warns that due to deeply rooted mindsets, it is not easy to effect change. According to the author, transformation is a slow process and it is like treating a chronic disease, which requires patience, endurance and determination. It is not just the start of the new regime that is important. Maintaining it will make a difference and it must therefore be reminded regularly.

It is a useful book because it helps bring about changes in the way we live our lives. What is needed is to identify our objectives and show resolve in implementing the plan.

Madan Sabnavis is Chief Economist of Bank of Baroda

How to change: the science of getting from where you are to where you want to be
Katy Milkman
Random penguin house
249 pages, 599 rupees

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Four New Crime Novels – The New York Times https://naxos-audiobooks.com/four-new-crime-novels-the-new-york-times/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 10:00:09 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/four-new-crime-novels-the-new-york-times/ Stephen Hunter really enjoys writing about guns. This is the main takeaway from TARGETED (Emily Bestler/Atria, 364 pages, $28.99), Bob Lee Swagger’s 12th novel. Previous volumes have painted more three-dimensional portraits of the supporting players surrounding Swagger, the 74-year-old former Marine sniper with a bad hip and an innate ability to kill, but this book […]]]>

Stephen Hunter really enjoys writing about guns. This is the main takeaway from TARGETED (Emily Bestler/Atria, 364 pages, $28.99), Bob Lee Swagger’s 12th novel. Previous volumes have painted more three-dimensional portraits of the supporting players surrounding Swagger, the 74-year-old former Marine sniper with a bad hip and an innate ability to kill, but this book dispenses with nuance except in loving descriptions of specific guns, cartridges and bullets.

The plot, on the thin side, involves Swagger being subpoenaed to testify at a House Judiciary Subcommittee meeting in Boise, Idaho (location not sufficiently explained), which quickly turns into a media circus in a hostage crisis. Swagger will save the day – he’s the hero of the show, so he has to – but not before disconcerting and confusing levels of violence are inflicted on him and others. Never mind the technically understandable but still confusing subplot involving an 18th-century sniper, whose exploits are detailed in self-contained “interludes.”

Is it entertaining? Yes, to some degree, because Hunter’s syncopated prose style has a satirical edge that carries the story, even if it doesn’t entirely suppress its ideological inclinations. (It’s unclear whether journalists or politicians get more narrative scorn.) Swagger, that old dog, battered and bruised beyond mere mortal possibility, still has a few tricks in him.


In recent years, a growing number of children’s and young adult book authors have turned to the detective genre, giving them the opportunity to flex different literary muscles. The latest is Marie Rutkoski, who clearly – and successfully – stretches with REALLY EASY (Holt, 320 pages, $26.99), a thoughtful, character-driven mystery delving into the world of sex work and the people who revolve around the industry, often at their peril.

We pass the first section with Samantha, one of the top employees at the Lovely Lady strip club, who struggles with a frayed relationship, disappointment about motherhood, and her inability to set boundaries. After he agrees to take another dancer home from work, tragedy ensues. From there, as the novel unfolds, he changes perspective among the other dancers, the detectives overseeing what becomes a criminal investigation, the other club employees, and the patrons.

Rutkoski has written a thought-provoking narrative reminiscent of, more recently, Ivy Pochoda’s “These Women.” It reverses standard crime tropes and reminds readers that stripping is work and women deserve to get through that work without the constant threat of violence and death.


I’m a shameless archival nerd, happy to spend hours immersed in primary source material for the projects I’m working on (or just for fun). This is why Eva Jurczyk’s first mystery, THE RARE BOOKS AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DEPARTMENT (Poisoned Pen, 315 pp., paper, $16.99), caught my attention. I am happy to report that he is as successful as I had hoped.

Liesl Weiss, who is nearing retirement, never expected to head the rare books and manuscripts division of the university library where she has worked for four decades, but when her longtime boss suffers a catastrophic stroke, she is appointed interim director. Almost immediately, she discovers that a prized acquisition—a centuries-old Bible—is missing; shortly after, a colleague disappears under suspicious circumstances. So Liesl sets out to solve the two mysteries even though she is constantly and infuriatingly warned by the school’s president, who is petrified about losing big donors in the middle of a fundraising campaign. (He doesn’t even want to report the missing Bible to the police.)

It’s a pleasure to see Liesl grow more confident and assertive with each page. Jurczyk, herself a librarian at the University of Toronto, aptly captures the trend in academia to prioritize institutional reputation over truth-finding.


A common truism in mystery novels is that after their debut, series writers usually suffer a second crisis. Yet that assumption is refuted time and time again: two of the best books of the last year included second efforts, by Stephen Spotswood and Richard Osman, and one by Robyn Gigl SURVIVOR’S GUILT (Kensington, 352 pages, $27) is so good that it could end up being one of the stars of this year.

The traumatic events of Erin McCabe’s hair-raising first adventure are in the rearview mirror, but external and internal conflict abounds. Along with her legal partner, Duane Swisher, Erin – a transgender lawyer – is representing a woman who pleaded guilty to manslaughter in her father’s death even as she swears her innocence and fears for her life. Ann Parsons is not who she claims to be, and the secrets she keeps, about herself and those she protects, have the power to shake the most disturbing cages.

As the case becomes extremely complex, Erin’s sense of self-esteem is challenged and threatened, but she repeatedly rises to the occasion in the courtroom, leading to scenes. of lawsuits that I read in one breathless gulp. A revolutionary series is about to become definitive.

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Book review: ‘Run With A Mighty Heart’ highlights a dark time – Horse Racing News https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-run-with-a-mighty-heart-highlights-a-dark-time-horse-racing-news/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 18:58:00 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-run-with-a-mighty-heart-highlights-a-dark-time-horse-racing-news/ Trainer Josie Carroll, jockey Daisuke Fukumoto and owner Larry Cordes pictured in 2020 with Queen’s Plate and Prince of Wales Mighty Heart winner As the COVID-19 pandemic swept through the province of Ontario in 2020, it hit the professional sports world with a stark reality. Spectators could not attend, jeopardizing events, millions of dollars and […]]]>

Trainer Josie Carroll, jockey Daisuke Fukumoto and owner Larry Cordes pictured in 2020 with Queen’s Plate and Prince of Wales Mighty Heart winner



As the COVID-19 pandemic swept through the province of Ontario in 2020, it hit the professional sports world with a stark reality. Spectators could not attend, jeopardizing events, millions of dollars and jobs. Public health restrictions have particularly impacted the horse racing industry to stop the spread of this terrible virus. For grooms, trainers, jockeys, racetrack officials and horse racing owners, the outbreak of COVID-19 has brought about a frustrating time of uncertainty and, for many who depend on the industry , a feeling of hopelessness.

Out of this darkness was born a story of perseverance and triumph, both human and equine. by Jennifer Morrison Run with a mighty heart is just that. The book explains how a one-eyed horse overcame his visual impairment to win the most publicized race in Canada. Mighty Heart has won ownership relationships beset by tragedy, a company making a Herculean effort to keep the show going, and thousands of fans across the country who needed encouragement in a time when there was no didn’t have much to celebrate.

It also shines a light on how the Woodbine thoroughbred racing community has come together to fight the pandemic and continue the great tradition of hosting the historic Queen’s Plate against the greatest odds during a pandemic. But, as we would say in racing parlance, getting it all was a 99-1 long shot.

Similarly, Morrison’s magnificent book is an account of how some human beings who endure crushing personal loss might ultimately find luck and triumph if they choose to continue living. For example, Mighty Heart owner Larry Cordes suffered tragedy when his wife, daughter and son-in-law succumbed to cancer and later setbacks as a Thoroughbred owner when horses were injured or died before they could reach their potential.

Although this is his first book, Morrison’s deep background as a sports journalist and knowledge of the people and players who make Woodbine successful shines through the narrative. Decades of research, conversations, crippling races and understanding the challenges faced by horses and the people who care for them inform this gripping story. Plus, the book features thrilling stories and insights from Mighty Heart’s trainer, Hall of Famer Josie Carroll and her supporting cast on the horse’s rise from rocky start to climax. Canadian races.

Run with a mighty heart also serves as a tribute to people from all walks of life who get up while most of the population sleeps to tend to the horses. Of course, there are a lot of things that go into race day prep. Horse racing may be the ‘sport of kings’, but the people behind it who make a day at the track enjoyable for bettors, fans and enthusiasts come from all walks of life. Yet all share a common determination, attention to detail and sense of purpose. It’s about the horses, but everyone matters – from the rider to the groom, from the trainer to the owner and staff, to officials and racetrack executives.

Morrison does not forget the horses. Documenting the rise of Mighty Heart, Morrison carefully describes the various physical and health curveballs thrown at these majestic yet fragile creatures. For example, a horse may have excellent reproduction, but exposure to parasites may make it sick or a bout of colic may end its life. Likewise, Mighty Heart’s romping around the paddock with other horses caused the young colt to lose an eye. These athletes work hard day in and day out, and their journey is often as complicated and uncertain as the path taken by those who care for them.

Run with a mighty heart should be required reading for all thoroughbred horse racing fans. It is an uplifting story of our ability to withstand the most complex challenges that life throws at us to continue our way of life, our great traditions and our recreational activities. Run with a mighty heart is also a living story of resilience, endurance and hope. This book tells a story that many people need right now.

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Uncommon Courage: Book Review – Yachting Monthly https://naxos-audiobooks.com/uncommon-courage-book-review-yachting-monthly/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 10:16:46 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/uncommon-courage-book-review-yachting-monthly/ Uncommon Courage: the Yachtsmen Volunteers of World War Two is a compelling account of the bravery and selflessness of the Royal Naval Volunteer Supplementary Reserve, says Peter Willis Extraordinary Courage: The Volunteer Boaters of World War IIJulia JonesAdlard Coles £20 (Posted 17 Mar 2022) It took the Royal Navy some time to get used to […]]]>

Uncommon Courage: the Yachtsmen Volunteers of World War Two is a compelling account of the bravery and selflessness of the Royal Naval Volunteer Supplementary Reserve, says Peter Willis

Extraordinary Courage: The Volunteer Boaters of World War II
Julia Jones
Adlard Coles £20 (Posted 17 Mar 2022)

It took the Royal Navy some time to get used to the assistance of yachtsmen who made up the Royal Naval Volunteer Supplementary Reserve at the start of the Second World War.

These “gentlemen, who are interested in yachting”, had, from 1936, been asked to volunteer for service in the Royal Navy “in case of emergency” – and initially without formal training, pay or uniform.

Instead, they were expected to use their own resources and initiatives – undertaking covert reconnaissance a la Erskine Childers, for example, while enjoying a summer cruise.

Many have returned to the classroom to earn chamber of commerce certificates and prepare for direct responsibility.

Although they may not always exemplify what is called “the innate subversiveness of small-boat sailing”, figures like Maurice Griffiths, Peter Scott, Robert Hichens, Nevil Shute Norway, Adrian Seligman and many others brought inventiveness to situations that sometimes challenged the ‘Seaway’ but achieved results.

Continued below…

The escapism of nautical thrillers can be a real draw, especially during the holiday season. Julia Jones reviews three of…

The best sailing books of 2021? Julia Jones reviews the latest maritime reading

The best children's books

Struggling to find the perfect gift for your young sailing enthusiast? Yachting Monthly’s literary critic Julia Jones picks the best…

Good little boat book

Julia Jones, literary critic for Yachting Monthly, talks about Good Little Ship; Arthur Ransome, Nancy Blackett and the Goblin by Peter Willis

They also wrote letters, diaries and memoirs, and it is these that Julia Jones has sifted through to form this remarkable mosaic of candid, front-line accounts of the war at sea.

Delivered with vivid and often offbeat detail, dark humor and modesty, they reveal some pretty staggering examples of bravery and selflessness.

There’s also a good measure of “untold stories” of triumphs and disasters – and touching reflections on the return to post-war “normality”.

For those of us who were the children of the men involved in these events but often chose not to talk about them, it is a deeply fascinating and moving document.

Jones herself, whose low-key, ever-human commentary makes it all bearable, is one of them; it was the discovery of a memoir by his own father in an attic that triggered the whole enterprise.

If you fancy getting to grips with what the maritime side of WWII was really like, I don’t think you’ll find a better (or more entertaining) source.

Buy Uncommon Courage: the Yachtsmen Volunteers of World War Two on Amazon (UK)

Buy Uncommon Courage: the Yachtsmen Volunteers of World War Two on Amazon (US)

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Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7 Review: Forced Hand https://naxos-audiobooks.com/power-book-ii-ghost-season-2-episode-7-review-forced-hand/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 02:05:00 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/power-book-ii-ghost-season-2-episode-7-review-forced-hand/ Everyone LIEs, your honor. It’s just lies, lies and more lies coming out of everyone’s mouths left and right. From Monet to Mecca, to Cane and Tariq, everyone lies in one way or another to protect themselves. But at some point, the lies catch up with you. They haven’t caught up with anyone yet, but […]]]>

Everyone LIEs, your honor.

It’s just lies, lies and more lies coming out of everyone’s mouths left and right. From Monet to Mecca, to Cane and Tariq, everyone lies in one way or another to protect themselves. But at some point, the lies catch up with you.

They haven’t caught up with anyone yet, but Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7 pushes the narrative toward a series of inevitable clashes between associates, strangers, and family members. And I say, let the carnage begin.

The most compelling story continues to be all about the Tejada family, which is falling apart. Monet pushes Diana so far that she is willing and ready to blow her place if the opportunity arises.

And then there’s Cane, who flounders as his place in the family grows more precarious by the minute. He started the season on the periphery, with Monet banishing him from more than Sunday dinners.

But now he and Monet are back in cahoots, and he’s desperate for Lorenzo’s attention and jealous of Dru for getting it instead.

Lorenzo places a lot of trust in Dru, and while it’s undeniable that it’s hard to say no to Lorenzo, it’s surprising how quickly he has fitted in as Lorenzo’s right-hand man. He doesn’t hesitate to shoot Kino, but his shock at the random girl as collateral damage shows he’s in over his head.

Rule number one; no details.

Lawrence [to Dru]

It would be one thing if they had come in with their faces covered or something, but how did Dru think that just warning the girl would be enough to appease Lorenzo?

Monet Works - Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7

In this world, there is nothing like leaving a free end behind. You simply cannot afford to offer that kind of blind loyalty to anyone, because when the time comes for that person to save themselves or protect you, they will always choose themselves.

That’s why now Dru finds himself in this position where he has to get rid of Everett because his boyfriend has already proven that he can’t be completely trusted. And it’s not like you can blame him for talking to the cops before, but that decision is never going to go away, unfortunately.

Everett is nice enough, but he has nothing to do with someone like Dru. He’s so clearly out of his element, and it could get him killed. But he’s also seen enough by this point to know that being a part of Dru’s life could be dangerous.

So what happens next is up to him.

Cane does things for his family in his heart, but he is also a selfish individual. He would much rather be at Lorenzo’s side than Dru, and he had no problem throwing Everett under his father’s bus.

Three's A Crowd - Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7

Cane is a bit lost right now, and he has very little control over anything. But a lot of the problems he finds himself in are due to his actions.

A lot could have been avoided if he hadn’t tried to frame Tariq, which he did out of anger more than anything – and deciding to threaten Davis at random? What was the purpose of this?

Cane is such an infuriating character sometimes because he feels like he’s about to be a super compelling antagonist, but they don’t make him competent enough for it to really stick.

Think Kanan in the original series. It was so easy to hate him and root for his downfall because they made him a multi-layered, smart villain. He was a formidable adversary for Ghost and Tommy as he was strong and able to overpower them.

Kanan was one of the best big baddies in the entire series, his only downside really being that he started to overstay his welcome towards the end.

Jenny On The Case - Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7

But with Cane, he just doesn’t seem like someone who can outwit anyone on his own. Like, does anyone think they could defeat Tariq?

Sure, he got Tariq arrested, and in theory Tariq could end up going for a double murder, but it’s far from a slamdunk.

What was Cane threatening Davis to accomplish? To begin with, it was so obvious that it was him. And second, what good is another body going to do for someone?

Saxe: For the first time, I think this kid might be innocent of something, and he won’t help us prove he’s been framed.
Davis: You don’t understand the streets, Saxony. Maybe he won’t talk shit, because he can’t talk shit.

Tariq is no snitch, and Cane should know that by now. But that doesn’t mean he’ll turn around and die either. He will fight for his freedom, but not at the expense of his family.

Tariq is a lot of things, and most of them aren’t good, but he loves Yas and he doesn’t want her caught up in her mistakes. The snitch puts her in a terrible position, as does putting her on the stand trying to provide him with an alibi.

Lawyer Mode - Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7

Going to trial is a huge risk, but if there’s anyone you want in your corner, it’s Davis. He is unethical and sneaky, and he will do anything to achieve victory. He did it with Tasha, and he seems more and more determined to do it here with Tariq.

Bringing Tameika back was a good reminder of her long history with all things St. Patrick, and she speaks to the side of Tariq that is often forgotten. He was not always a dangerous child, but a lost one who decided to take a path that now leads him exactly where his father always warned him he would end up.

But this case could be a watershed moment for him. Will he end up looking like Ghost and running away from life (as much as he can) if he’s acquitted? Or will he keep doing what he’s doing and hope to stay alive and get out of jail?

Only time will tell, but you need to be thinking about the latter right now.

Speaking of Tariq, what’s going on with him and his love life? I fully believed that confiding in Effie during Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 6 was his way of “choosing” someone who understood him and allowed him to be himself.

Tate Makes Moves - Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7

It wasn’t like I thought dating meant they were in a committed relationship, but falling into bed with Diana after the two hadn’t been on that wavelength all season seemed odd. and moved.

When Effie and Diana had that moment when they were shopping, they both felt like they were in a place where they weren’t going to let a man, especially Tariq, get the best of them.

But alas, here we are.

I would be remiss if I did not mention things with Mecca and Monet, which are not going very well.

It would be easy to feel bad for Mecca if he wasn’t a lying sociopath. Monet takes Zeke away from him to protect his life. And it’s without even knowing that he’s been lying to her since he came back to town.

Mecca Demands - Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7

He’s talking about a big game and you want to feel sorry for him because he seems to want to know about Zeke, but there’s just something wrong. And we’re almost at the point in the season where we should figure out what he’s really looking for.

Giving all of his proceeds to Lorenzo seems calculated. Like maybe his goal is to somehow get Lorenzo in trouble and get him out of the way so he can get Monet back.

Or maybe it’s even more significant than that.

Either way, Zeke will eventually figure it out, because now that he has this idea of ​​his father in his head, he just won’t be able to forget it. And neither does Mecca.

We’re building towards the climax here, and the lies will be exposed. And I say, bring him.

Plead Your Case - Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7

Everything you need to know

  • No matter how badly Brayden takes it out on his terrible family, they’re still his family. And after just reconciling with Tariq, hearing that he went behind his back with the Sweeney exposure must hurt. This should have bigger consequences than just the two not getting along.
  • Carrie couldn’t be more insufferable if she tried. She made her bed, and now that she has to lie on it, she doesn’t know how to go about it. Tate’s speech was cute, but it’s going to be hard for Carrie to get out of the hole she’s made for herself.
  • I forget Mecca’s real name is Dante. When a character has more than one identity, I always stick to the identity that was presented to us first. And we met Mecca long before we met Dante.
  • They didn’t give us enough Davis, but when Method Man has his time, he makes the most of it. He steals so many scenes.
Carrie Reacts - Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7
  • I know things move faster in TV country, but I feel like Tariq was arrested on a Tuesday and his trial starts on Friday.

There are only two episodes left until the finale, so that means it’s time to start making predictions!

Where do you see things heading for Monet and his family?

Will Davis be able to free Tariq for good?

Drop a line below and watch Power Book II: Ghost online now so you can join the discussion!

Zeke Reacts - Power Book II: Ghost Season 2 Episode 7

Whitney Evans is an editor for TV Fanatic. Follow her on Twitter.

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Ride or die? Mark Bould and the Fast-and-Furiocene https://naxos-audiobooks.com/ride-or-die-mark-bould-and-the-fast-and-furiocene/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 16:03:07 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/ride-or-die-mark-bould-and-the-fast-and-furiocene/ WHAT IS JANE Austen’s Novel mansfield park (1814), DC Comics Swamp Thing (1971), and the Sharknado film franchise (2013-18) have in common? According to Mark Bould’s new book, The Anthropocene Unconscious: The Culture of Climate Catastrophe, they’re all about climate change. In reality, all cultural texts deal with climate change in one way or another, […]]]>

WHAT IS JANE Austen’s Novel mansfield park (1814), DC Comics Swamp Thing (1971), and the Sharknado film franchise (2013-18) have in common? According to Mark Bould’s new book, The Anthropocene Unconscious: The Culture of Climate Catastrophe, they’re all about climate change. In reality, all cultural texts deal with climate change in one way or another, if we learn to read not for climate as the main actor, but for its latency, its exclusion and what distracts us from it. For all of the book’s somewhat playful irreverence to low-intellect and intellectual cultural distinctions, Bould makes a compelling case for what cultural critique should be in the Anthropocene, and he does so in the hope of reduce some of the slow violence and injustices of the many and unevenly distributed effects of climate change.

Bould’s argument, particularly in the first half of his book, is pointed squarely and unabashedly at Amitav Ghosh, whose 2016 book, The Great Disruption: Climate Change and the Unthinkable, continues to be a pivotal text on literature and the climate crisis. In The great inconvenience, Ghosh argues that contemporary writers do not address the topic of climate change enough. In a climate-changed future where humans seek proof of its impending doom in the art and literature of the past, Ghosh writes that they will fail to find it and will be forced to conclude “that ours was a time when most forms of art and literature were drawn into modes of concealment that prevented people from acknowledging the realities of their plight[.]Bould wastes no time ignoring Ghosh’s speculation: “That is, of course, nonsense.

Bould is right, I think, to criticize Ghosh’s disregard for the many sites that have long posed climate problems. Science fiction is, according to many science fiction scholars, the indisputable predecessor of what is now commonly referred to as “climate fiction”. In short, a critique of Ghosh’s elitism feeds The Anthropocene Unconscious Right off the bat: Bould focuses on lowbrow and popular culture throughout his analysis. Moreover, in chapter three, he reads exactly the texts that Ghosh claimed to be not on the climate fiction against him, showing that in fact, they are too. In short, I don’t think it’s an overstatement to say that one of the book’s major contributions is its brazen confrontation with what is often seen as a seminal text in climate change fiction and scholarship.

The variety of texts, media and genres covered in this book is often unexpected and impressive in scope. Each demonstrates that no matter where one looks, one will find that “the Anthropocene is the unconscious of ‘the art and literature of our time’. » Climate change can be found in the disturbances due to the effects of climate change in the text. Topics such as the histories of slavery and colonialism can be found, both as events and structures that contributed and continue to contribute to climate change, in some cases. silences on the subjects of the text or refusal by characters to answer questions about slavery – for example, in mansfield park. Bould writes:[C]The ritics are not bathyspheric explorers probing the textual depths. At no point do we even need to break the surface. The clamor of the unsaid is everywhere. Rather, he imagines the work of the critic in the Anthropocene to “make the text speak”.

the Sharknado franchise is the prime example of where the Anthropocene unconscious lurks. Bould argues that despite only one utterance of the words “climate change” in all five films, the franchise features the consequences of anthropogenic climate change throughout. Admittedly, it is a bit difficult to see what exactly is “unconscious” in the Anthropocene in this example where the tornadoes surrounded by sharks are the main event and one of the films is even titled Global Swarm. The films contain dozens of “[l]ludicrous, crudely rendered images of climate change,” as Bould writes. But these “big dumb reminders” are precisely the overblown evidence of climate change that suggests real disaster lurks just below the surface. In part, it’s a point about the technological details of image editing and CGI distracting rather than overtly addressing the effects of climate change.

It would be impossible to detail all the texts covered in this book, because each chapter moves quickly from one genre and one medium to another, even from one century to another and from one continent to another. . Suffice it to say that after leaving the waters of Sharknado and the landscapes of the zombie apocalypse in the first chapter, we then migrate into the “commonplace novel”. What interests Bould about the banal novel, which he says developed in 18th century Europe, is that it focuses on the ordinary, the regularity of everyday life and a notion of bourgeois individualism. . Bould refutes the notion that bounded individualism was (or still is) a function of the new form through a number of examples that demonstrate the larger, unconscious role of climate change and its layered histories. While it might seem like something as vast and distributed as climate change would have little obvious place in the mundane novel, it situates it again and again convincingly. mansfield park, for example, is a story about what some have called the Plantation-o-cene (instead of the Anthropocene) because of how the enslavement and forced labor of black Africans can be said to have initiated the ‘Anthropocene. In the novel, for example, Fanny Price, staying at the Bertram estate, which depends on the Antiguan plantations, asks questions about slavery, but only gets silence in return. The numerous silences in the texts examined (Paul Auster, Lucy Ellmann and the 4,000-page autobiographical novel by Karl Ove Knausgaard are also studied) reveal the ways in which the Anthropocene unconscious can also be operative in the service of disempowerment or a refusal to acknowledge the complicity in the continuing history of slavery and forced labor that continues to underpin the conditions of the Anthropocene.

While chapter three analyzes three novelists against Ghosh’s claims in The great inconvenience (including novels by Ghosh himself), in chapter four Bould reads Arthur C. Clarke and J.G. Ballard alongside Mauro Herce’s contemporary art cinema (Dead slowly forward, 2015), Ryan Gosling (lost river, 2014), Lucile Hadžihalilović (Evolution, 2015), and others. He tells a lot of novels and movies in this book, but his description of Mauro Herce Dead slowly forward was for me the most poetic and captivating writing in the book (“There is water above and below. The machinery sounds like a whale song. Aquatic, amniotic, as if we were carried and born out of this world and into another”). The film presents a developmental narrative that disrupts the temporal forward march of industrial time, what Bould calls a “time mismatch between humans and physics.” The reading of the concept of “development” in the film is simply magnificent; it’s about time clots and time shifts, lost connections and severed ties, and, in the background, a throbbing turbine and the distant groan of machines. Moving from water to trees, the final chapter, “We Am Groot,” examines trees to elicit an environmental weirdness that blurs the distinctions between animate and inanimate, human and non-human. Again, we move between unlikely bedfellows: Andrey Zvyagintsev’s movies to DC’s Swamp Thing, Marvel’s Man-Thing to Groot, a humanoid tree that can talk, but only to announce itself: “I am Groot”. Bould describes at least two forms of environmental weirdness, which can insist on a kind of nonhuman vitality “embedded in our environment” and in which nonhumans must, and which can be explained in a multitude of ways and in dozens of texts. “It’s not a hopeless case,” he writes, to include other species and beings in human cultural imaginaries and social orders.

As irreverent and playful as the book is, it also does the serious work of modeling a kind of critical practice—not reserved for scholars, but rather one that should be widely used as a mode of reading in and for the Anthropocene. Bould writes that the more prevalent this type of critique, the withdrawal of the unconscious from the Anthropocene, “the greater our chances of bridging the gap between, on the one hand, too few/too late/if no at all to climate catastrophe […] and on the other, a flourishing biosphere in which we too thrive. The Anthropocene Unconscious believes in the work of the critic in this mode to transform the world, or the planet, by reading differently. In this case, reading for the unconscious of the Anthropocene opens wide the plurality and multitude of narratives and stories that must all be recognized as contributing to the so-called Anthropocene. It teaches that it is not possible to extract cultural object from the quagmires of capitalism, colonialism, histories of slavery, land dispossession and genocide that continue to fuel what we call the Anthropocene. Of course, these permanent structures of violence are not compatible with the longevity of this planet or its many human and non-human inhabitants.

So Bould gives us two choices on the last page, where we end up in what he calls (much to my delight) the “Fast-and-Furiocene”: ride or die. To choose to roll is to choose to pursue something other than death for the planet and its inhabitants, that is ecosocialism. But the choice is complicated, especially in a world in which, as Bould writes, we are somehow trapped and over which we feel we have no direct control. It is also indeed too late for many biophysical processes already underway that will have terribly devastating effects on the planet. Bould does not deny these facts, but, precisely because of them, rather points out that we can always—indeed, must—be responsible for how certain impending disasters, and their respite, are distributed now and in the future.

¤

Alison Sperling is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Technical University of Berlin and an affiliated researcher at the ICI Institute for Cultural Inquiry Berlin.

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New in Paperback: “Made in China” and “Better Luck Next Time” https://naxos-audiobooks.com/new-in-paperback-made-in-china-and-better-luck-next-time/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 10:00:04 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/new-in-paperback-made-in-china-and-better-luck-next-time/ FOUR LOST CITIES: A Secret History of the Urban Age, by Annalee Newitz. (Norton, 320 pages, $17.95.) This tale traces the rise and fall of four ancient cities: Pompeii, Çatalhöyük in central Turkey, Angkor in Cambodia, and the indigenous metropolis Cahokia along the Mississippi River. Our reviewer, Russell Shorto, compared the book to a cross […]]]>

FOUR LOST CITIES: A Secret History of the Urban Age, by Annalee Newitz. (Norton, 320 pages, $17.95.) This tale traces the rise and fall of four ancient cities: Pompeii, Çatalhöyük in central Turkey, Angkor in Cambodia, and the indigenous metropolis Cahokia along the Mississippi River. Our reviewer, Russell Shorto, compared the book to a cross between “a travel guide to places that no longer exist” and “a compendium of archaeological finds about the urban origins of mankind”.

THE BAD MUSLIM DISCOUNT, by Syed M. Masood. (Anchor, 368 pages. $17.) According to our reviewer, Chelsea Leu, this novel “presents a stereoscopic, three-dimensional view of contemporary Muslim America: how historical conflict in the Middle East lingers in the lives of individuals, how gossip spreads through a community close-knit immigrants”.

MADE IN CHINA: A prisoner, an SOS letter and the hidden cost of cheap American goods, by Amelia Pang. (Algonquin, 288 pages, $16.95.) This investigation into labor practices in China follows Sun Yi, a Falun Gong practitioner who is forced to work in a labor camp in the northeast region of the country. Pang’s narrative “seems timely and urgent,” noted our reviewer Lauren Hilgers, especially when it puts “the production and the torture side by side.”

MORE LUCK NEXT TIME, by Julia Claiborne Johnson. (Custom House, 304 pages, $16.99.) According to our reviewer, Alida Becker, this novel is filled with “movie star silks” who spend several weeks together on “a 1930s Nevada dude ranch full of women about to be divorced.” The result is a “powerful mix of hooch, heartache and high altitude” and lots of mess.

ANARCHY: The East India Company, corporate violence and the plunder of an empire, by William Dalrymple. (Bloomsbury, 576 pages, $20.) “The greatest virtue of this disturbingly enjoyable book” on the history of the East India Company, commented our reviewer, Ian Morris, “is perhaps less the questions it answers than the stories it arouses on the place of companies in the world”.

A LIE SOMEONE TOLD YOU ABOUT YOURSELF, by Peter Ho Davies. (Mariner, 256 pages, $15.99.) “Novels and memoirs that begin with a pregnancy tend to follow a predictable trajectory,” observed our reviewer, Elisabeth Egan. Instead, Davies’ novel “throws new ingredients into the family pot.” There are two pregnancies, an abortion, an autism plot, and an honest account of parenthood with “a distinctive whiff of memory.”

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Book Review: Star Wars: Jedi Artifacts: Treasures From a Galaxy Far, Far Away https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-star-wars-jedi-artifacts-treasures-from-a-galaxy-far-far-away/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 22:28:39 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-star-wars-jedi-artifacts-treasures-from-a-galaxy-far-far-away/ Star Wars: Jedi Artifacts: Treasures from a Galaxy Far, Far Away From keychains to a punched ship model, discover a dozen inserts inspired by the legendary Jedi Knights! A collection of treasures centered around the galaxy’s greatest heroes, Star Wars: Jedi Artifacts features exciting collectibles that represent thrilling moments in the history of the Jedi […]]]>

Star Wars: Jedi Artifacts: Treasures from a Galaxy Far, Far Away

From keychains to a punched ship model, discover a dozen inserts inspired by the legendary Jedi Knights!

A collection of treasures centered around the galaxy’s greatest heroes, Star Wars: Jedi Artifacts features exciting collectibles that represent thrilling moments in the history of the Jedi Order.

• COLLECT A DOZEN OF UNIQUE ARTIFACTS: Featuring a woven patch, a perforated ship model, high-quality stickers, a collectible pin, keychains and other amazing items, this kit makes a great gift for lovers. Star Wars fans of all ages.

• DISCOVER LEGENDARY JEDI ADVENTURES: From the heroic days of the High Republic to the times of Obi-Wan Kenobi, Ahsoka Tano, Luke Skywalker and Rey, Star Wars: Jedi Artifacts compiles exquisite inserts inspired by the Jedi and their valiant adventures.

• BUILD YOUR STAR WARS COLLECTION: Star Wars: Jedi Artifacts sit alongside fan-favorite Star Wars books, including Star Wars: The Lightsaber Collection, Star Wars: The Secrets of the Jedi, and Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge: The Official Black Spire Outpost Cookbook .

Publication date: January 11, 2022
Number of pages: 16 pages
ISBN: 9781647224936

While there’s always room for novels, comics, magazines, and coffee table tomes that delve into the making and characters of the galaxy far, far away, Star wars has also brought us a range of more tactile builds over the decades that get the creative juices flowing and allow for Easter eggs and cool elements not found anywhere else. From The Empire Strikes Back Mix or Match Storybook to the many Pop-Up releases over the years, getting your hands on and in a book is a huge pleasure, most vividly expressed by Steve Sansweets Marvelous 1998 Star Wars Album, a much-loved release that recreated a number of moments from the past, including a copy of the very first issue of the Star wars Fan Club Newsletter, soon to be renamed Bantha Tracks. Star Wars: Jedi Artifacts: Treasures from a Galaxy Far, Far Away does not send us back to our earthly past like the Scrapbook do; instead it gives us a deeper dive into the world of the Jedi universe, showcasing ‘artifacts’ between its relatively small 4 x 9.75 inch hardback covers covering a number of key eras of The High Republic at the time of Rey Skywalker.

It may only be 16 pages, but there’s a lot to dig into here. Falsely detailed, the book opens with a booklet of quotes called ‘The Wisdom of the Light Side of the Force‘ which contains wise knowledge and advice from generations of Jedi, accompanied by beautiful watercolor illustrations. Inside the cover it is joined by the iconic Jedi Code – ‘There is no emotion, there is peace“, words as relevant to modern-day Jedi as they have been to generations past.

An envelope adorned with the Jedi insignia contains a sepia drawing of a lightsaber and a smaller booklet showing the various forms of lightsaber combat while the right side of the book – the largest section of the version – is filled with trinkets. We look at Luke and his training with Yoda, as well as a tiny but striking insignia showing his battle with Darth Vader in Bespin and their final moments aboard the Death Star. Turn the page and it’s Kylo Ren, the temperamental nephew of Luke and Ahsoka Tano the Jedi who has made it despite the bad way the Jedi Order treated him. Attached to her page are keychains, die-cut to represent her two lightsabers, while a page turn reveals Rey and a beautiful badge printed with the Jedi Order logo.

We look at the era of The High Republic and their Jedi Vectors, one version of which can be cut out of a card and hung via string as a pendant. There is a sticker sheet of a customizable lightsaber with hilt pieces as stickers allowing you to design your own lightsaber and on the page a larger star wars rebels sticker of that final, indelible image of the artwork we saw in the final seconds of the show. As we come to the end of our journey, we even get a glimpse of Obi-Wan Kenobi’s diary in Aurebesh and Basic as he writes about young Luke Skywalker.

Star wars is a lot of things for a lot of people, but the one thing you always have to strive for is a feeling of pleasure. Star Wars: Jedi Artifacts: Treasures From a Galaxy Far, Far Away delivers that in droves, with its clever design and attractive layout. Fingers crossed we get more releases in this vein; a bounty hunters book with washers and chain codes, a smugglers book with dice and spices, even a sith lords book with guides and focusing crystals. The opportunities are endless, so hopefully there will be more to come from the Artifact lineup.

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CTech Book Review: Laying the Groundwork for a Successful Career https://naxos-audiobooks.com/ctech-book-review-laying-the-groundwork-for-a-successful-career/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 10:10:06 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/ctech-book-review-laying-the-groundwork-for-a-successful-career/ Dana Poleg is CMO at Five Sigma, a company that has developed an insurance claims management platform. She joined CTech to share a review of “The First 90 Days” by Michael D. Watkins. Title: “The first 90 days” Author: Michael D. Watkins Format: Delivered Or: Homepage Dana Poleg is Director of Marketing at Five Sigma. […]]]>
Dana Poleg is CMO at Five Sigma, a company that has developed an insurance claims management platform. She joined CTech to share a review of “The First 90 Days” by Michael D. Watkins.

Title: “The first 90 days”

Author: Michael D. Watkins

Format: Delivered

Or: Homepage

Dana Poleg is Director of Marketing at Five Sigma. Photo: Heftsy Elgar / Amazon

Summary:

Transitions are critical times for leaders. In fact, most executives agree that moving to a new role is the biggest challenge a manager will face. While transitions offer a chance to start fresh and make necessary changes in the organization, they also place leaders in a position of acute vulnerability. This book offers proven strategies for meeting the challenge of transitioning, no matter where you are in your career.

By guiding you through all aspects of the transition scenario, Watkins identifies the most common pitfalls encountered by new leaders and provides the tools and strategies you need to avoid them. You will learn, for example, how to achieve early wins, an important first step in establishing yourself in your new role.

Each chapter also includes checklists, how-to tools, and self-assessments to help you take in the key lessons and apply them to your own situation.

Important topics:

  • The first 90 days in a new role are critical. Success or failure in the first few months is a good predictor of overall success or failure in the new job.
  • Transitions are a time of acute vulnerability because you lack established working relationships and a detailed understanding of your new role.
  • The goal of every transition is to hit “break even” as quickly as possible – the point at which you’ve added as much value to your new organization as you’ve consumed.
  • Some of the more common ‘transition traps’ are: sticking to what you know, setting unrealistic expectations, trying to do too much, coming up with ‘the’ answer, and engaging in the wrong kind of learning. .

The good news is that there are things you can do to dramatically speed up your transition to your new role and make it a success. Some of them are:

  • Take a mental break from your old job and get ready for the new one.
  • Tailor your strategy to the specific situation you find yourself in.
  • Secure the first gains to strengthen credibility and create momentum.
  • Build your team.
  • Negotiating Success – Building a productive working relationship with your new boss.

What I learned :

This “The First 90 Days” book was recommended to me by Renee Russel, a professional mentor I worked with a few years ago. She suggested that I read the book as I stepped into my new role as Five Sigma Marketing Director.

The book gave me a really good step-by-step blueprint for what to do and how in the first 90 days after being appointed to my new role. There are many things to remember, but the main one is that entering a new role requires extensive preparation in many dimensions:

  • Spiritually: Mentally prepare for the new challenge and let go of the past and accept my new functions and responsibilities.
  • Intellectually: Make sure I identify any gaps I have and that I engage in the right kind of learning. If you don’t acquire enough knowledge about the organization and its business operations, you can make wrong assumptions, which are fatal to the business and your career.
  • Relationships: Build strong relationships with my boss, peers, and team. All of them require deep thinking and thoughtful actions. Relationships are the key to success.

Reviews:

The book deals with all kinds of transitions: a new role in a new organization, a new role in the same organization, moving up or moving laterally.

I was particularly interested in a situation of evolving into a new role and a new organization, as such some examples were more relevant to me.

Who should read this book:

This book is a MUST for any leader entering a new role. Taking the time to read and prepare will dramatically increase your ability to be successful in your new role.

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Book Review: The Two Michaels and the Arrest of Meng Wanzhou https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-the-two-michaels-and-the-arrest-of-meng-wanzhou/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 22:08:52 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-the-two-michaels-and-the-arrest-of-meng-wanzhou/ A new book tells the interweaving stories of a Chinese executive arrested in Vancouver and two Canadian men detained in China. A Vancouver courtroom is a harmless place for the start of a battle between the United States and China, but with the southern neighbor’s request for the extradition of a senior electronics executive in […]]]>

A new book tells the interweaving stories of a Chinese executive arrested in Vancouver and two Canadian men detained in China.

A Vancouver courtroom is a harmless place for the start of a battle between the United States and China, but with the southern neighbor’s request for the extradition of a senior electronics executive in 2018, it was on.

When Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou’s plane arrived in Vancouver in December 2018 and was arrested, Beijing was furious.

Soon after, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor were detained in China.

Nothing to do with Meng, Beijing said.

And so, a saga unfolded. National and international media flooded Vancouver courthouses. The case has gone viral.

Now all the strings of the case have been gathered.

The Two Michaels: Innocent Canadian Captives and High-Stakes Espionage in the US-China Cyber ​​War by Mike Blanchfield and Fen Osler Hampson details Meng’s arrest in Canada and his extradition hearings in the United States. It is associated with the detention of “Two Michaels” of Canada in China and allows for a captivating reading of the news.

The authors reconstructed the whole picture: US-Chinese-Canadian relations; battles for cyber supremacy and bickering over what constitutes the rule of law depending on which country you are in; genocide and human rights; the Michaels background; the future of high-tech communications and espionage.

A central tenet of the book is the authors’ argument that Ottawa’s insistence on adhering to its extradition treaty with the United States in accordance with international law, let alone prestige.

The authors argue that Ottawa could have ended the extradition process at any time using ministerial prerogative.

Meng could have returned home and the Michaels could have returned to Canada.

Of course, that is ultimately what happened – but only after a lot of saber-stripping and screaming.

The 281-page book’s conclusion appears on page 123: “The hearings have served as a new front in the epic struggle between China and the United States for economic and political supremacy, a struggle with grave repercussions not only for Meng. and the two Michaels, but for the future of the Internet and all who use it.

The Two Michaels tells an international saga of political relations and cybersecurity

jhainsworth@glaciermedia.ca
twitter.com/jhainswo



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