Book review – Naxos Audio books http://naxos-audiobooks.com/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 12:59:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-100x100.png Book review – Naxos Audio books http://naxos-audiobooks.com/ 32 32 Taste by Stanley Tucci, Book Review: An Ode to Food and the People We Love Most https://naxos-audiobooks.com/taste-by-stanley-tucci-book-review-an-ode-to-food-and-the-people-we-love-most/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 10:58:07 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/taste-by-stanley-tucci-book-review-an-ode-to-food-and-the-people-we-love-most/ IIf you are looking for details on the career of great actor Stanley Tucci, you should probably pass on his adorable new memoir. Taste: My life through food. Nowhere in its 300 witty pages will you learn what inspired Tucci to become an actor or what it was like to wear a lavender puff wig […]]]>

IIf you are looking for details on the career of great actor Stanley Tucci, you should probably pass on his adorable new memoir. Taste: My life through food. Nowhere in its 300 witty pages will you learn what inspired Tucci to become an actor or what it was like to wear a lavender puff wig in The hunger Games or to kiss Colin Firth in Supernova.

At 60, “approaching the middle to late fall” of his years, Tucci discovers that food – in particular, the way food connects him to the people he loves – means more to him. than show business. A handful of famous co-stars are making cameos in Taste, but only because they were sitting across from him at a memorable meal. This book focuses on Tucci’s more intimate dining experiences: the eggplant parm hoagies his mother packed in his childhood lunch boxes, the coq au vin he ate on his first date with his first wife, Kate (died of breast cancer in 2009), wonderful breakfasts on German film sets (“Someone please employ me there again”) and how he passes on family culinary traditions to his children, one salami sandwich at a time.

And what rich traditions they are. Tucci grew up in semi-rural Westchester County, New York, where he once found his immigrant Italian grandmother skinning a squirrel on the porch. Bottles of tomato sauce, simmered over an open fire and filtered through a pillowcase, lined the shelves in the damp basement where her grandfather made cloudy purple wine. “Was it the best wine in the world? Tucci asks. “No. Was it the worst? Very close. Did it matter? No. It was part of my grandfather, whom we adored, and it made it the sweetest liquid that ever passed between. our lips.

(Fig tree)

This fusion of love and nourishment is what gives Tucci’s book its sweetness. He lovingly writes his family’s rituals, from the Christmas timpani (a mighty pastry drum stuffed with ziti, salami, cheese, eggs and meatballs) to epic Independence Day picnics. during which the guests played pétanque, sang “Yankee Doodle”, drank a jug of wine and feasted on sausages and peppers. Of her mother, Tucci writes, “I can honestly say that on the four-burner electric stove that she used throughout my childhood and the gas stove that replaced it many years later, she never cooked a bad meal. Not once. ”The book includes a handful of recipes, including the meaty Tucci family stew that I can’t wait to try.

Tucci loves restaurants almost as much as home cooking. He lovingly describes the old Manhattan restaurants that supported him as a struggling young actor, places like Big Nick’s, which sold “huge fatty and bloody burgers on plump buns.” There will always be a place in her heart for Carnegie Deli, where towering pastrami sandwiches nourished body and mind ‘when you came home late at night from a few too many at a cheap downtown bar. town, on your way to the one bedroom apartment that you thought you would live for the rest of your life if someone didn’t give you a job soon ”.

Apparently someone gave him a job pretty quickly because within a few chapters Tucci dines at glamorous restaurants in remote places like Vancouver, Normandy, and Reykjavik. Even when the food isn’t fabulous – he’s not a fan of Icelandic puffins – it makes for a good story. In one of the funniest scenes in the book, in a Norman bistro, Tucci and his companions, including Meryl Streep, recklessly order an andouillette, a mysterious French sausage. Tucci looked down at her plate when she arrived and announced, in colorful language, that she looked like the private parts of a male horse. Streep nodded. Scented with cow intestines, it tasted even worse than it looked and everyone shyly sent back their andouillette and ordered omelets.

Since 2012, Tucci has gradually placed food at the center of its professional life. He has written two cookbooks and earlier this year won an Emmy for his television series In search of Italy, a tantalizing tour of the country’s distinctive regional cuisines. But in the darkest irony, in the book’s penultimate chapter, Tucci reveals that in 2017, he was diagnosed with salivary gland cancer. The horrific treatment not only made him sick to his stomach, it also made his mouth burn with the water “like battery acid”. For six months, he poured his food directly into his stomach through a feeding tube. Fortunately, Tucci is once again able to savor his favorite dishes which he lists on a page towards the end of the book, from “chili con carne (extremely sweet!)” To “a fried egg on a very fine toasted bagel”. Reading this book will make you more aware of the glorious – or modest – food at your table, and the people you have the privilege of sharing it with.

Jennifer Reese is the author of “Make the Bread, Buy the Butter”.

© The Washington Post


Source link

]]>
Book review: “The FN-49 – the last elegant military rifle of the old world” https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-the-fn-49-the-last-elegant-military-rifle-of-the-old-world/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 11:51:55 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-the-fn-49-the-last-elegant-military-rifle-of-the-old-world/ Whether you call it the ABL, SAFN, Model 49, or just the FN-49, this is one of the most stylish military autoloading rifles ever made. Author Wayne Johnson has done the gun community a service with the first edition of this book in 2004. The second edition of The FN-49, the last elegant military rifle […]]]>

Whether you call it the ABL, SAFN, Model 49, or just the FN-49, this is one of the most stylish military autoloading rifles ever made. Author Wayne Johnson has done the gun community a service with the first edition of this book in 2004. The second edition of The FN-49, the last elegant military rifle of the old world is more than double the size of the previous book with a lot of new information incorporated into its pages. The author’s continued research into firearms over the past 15 years has resulted in a 460-page book with over 1,100 photographs and illustrations, including numerous combat and training images of its use in the world.

The book opens with an overview of National Factory until the introduction of the FN-49, includes a biography of weapons designer Dieudonné Saive and chronicles previous autoloading rifles, such as the Experimental Autoloading Rifles (SLEM) and EXP, which led to the development of the 1949 model.

A range of contract rifles are covered in separate chapters, and FN-49 sniper variants are also included. Readers will find the various rifles covered in startling detail and, thanks to FN’s opening its searchable records, reprinted “Order Lists” provide order details for each rifle contract from April 1949 to the final order of FN-49 delivered to Century Arms. in 1975.

Excellent color photographs and original images, factory drawings, manuals and advertisements help tell the story of these superbly designed rifles in a visually striking way.

The 8¾ “x111 / 4” hardcover book is available through fnbrowning.com, (336) 394-4138, and is priced at $ 74. For NRA members who reference this review, a coupon will be available for a limited time from the publisher for free shipping.


Source link

]]>
Franzen dreams big and goes deep, with ‘Crossroads’ https://naxos-audiobooks.com/franzen-dreams-big-and-goes-deep-with-crossroads/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 12:02:28 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/franzen-dreams-big-and-goes-deep-with-crossroads/ “Carrefour” by Jonathan Franzen (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) Jonathan Franzen dreams big. His latest novel, “Crossroads”, arrives with a thud on the doorstep of readers and will easily keep those doors open at 580 pages. The themes are monumental – from the existence of God to our obligations to family to the morality of war. […]]]>

“Carrefour” by Jonathan Franzen (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Jonathan Franzen dreams big. His latest novel, “Crossroads”, arrives with a thud on the doorstep of readers and will easily keep those doors open at 580 pages. The themes are monumental – from the existence of God to our obligations to family to the morality of war. It is also the first of a trilogy entitled, by aspiration, “The key to all mythologies”.

But don’t let all the hype surrounding a Franzen novel overwhelm you before you read it. In many ways, this is Peak Franzen, with richly created characters, conflict, and plot. “Crossroads” introduces readers to the Hildebrandt family in the early 1970s. The patriarch, Russ, is a middle-aged associate pastor in a church in suburban Chicago, with less than pure thoughts on a widowed parishioner of his. congregation and a younger rival in the clergy, Rick Ambrose, whose thriving youth group gives the novel its name. Russ’s wife Marion wonders if all the sacrifices she made to be a pastor’s wife were worth it. And their four children, from oldest to youngest – Clem, Becky, Perry and Judson – are all taken in one way or another by the swirling cultural winds of the decade. Despite their religious upbringing, or perhaps partly because of it, there are temptations around every turn, from drugs to premarital sex.

And in typical Franzen fashion, we dig deep into the heads of all the characters (except Judson, who at age 9 is mostly spared from the inner monologue) as they navigate their lives. Introspection is sometimes dizzying. Just when a character convinces himself to do something, he reconsiders and the plot takes a new direction. That’s not to say that it all seems arbitrary. Franzen has a story to tell, it’s just a story about characters who aren’t always sure what they want. The title of the novel is more than just the name of the church youth group, after all.

The writing is a marvel. Despite the super omniscient third-person narrator, Franzen also delivers economic lines like these, as we get Marion’s story before she met Russ: “Her first Christmas alone wasn’t that bad. ‘he didn’t look good later. ” You feel like you’re in the hands of a very confident storyteller throughout, and the joy of the novel accompanies the journey with each character as they make choices and live with the consequences.

You also feel when you are done that the story has only just begun. We are told on the cover of the book that the trilogy will “span three generations,” which means the kids will likely be adults in the next volume, and then we’ll tackle the present with their kids. It’s reminiscent of Updike’s “Rabbit” novels in this regard, except that its scope is even broader. Russ gets the most pages in the number one novel, but it really is a family saga. Her lifestyle choices and the impact they have on the rest of the family will set the stage for what happens in books two and three. And that’s the hard part. An audience accustomed to over-watching will have to wait years for the Hildebrandt story to unfold. But isn’t that a moral in many mythologies? Good things happen to those who wait.


Source link

]]>
Book review | All India Radio and the birth of a nation https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-all-india-radio-and-the-birth-of-a-nation/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 10:11:27 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-all-india-radio-and-the-birth-of-a-nation/ It seems unimaginable now with the cacophony of TV stations scrambling for attention and the proliferation of social media, but there was a time when All India Radio ruled the news space. People got the news of the day not only from the newspapers, but also from AIR’s prime-time radio show at 9 a.m. Listening […]]]>

It seems unimaginable now with the cacophony of TV stations scrambling for attention and the proliferation of social media, but there was a time when All India Radio ruled the news space. People got the news of the day not only from the newspapers, but also from AIR’s prime-time radio show at 9 a.m. Listening to the news on the radio was a must for most people. AIR news was the only way for the government to communicate with citizens living in remote corners of the country.

Like many other institutions in India, AIR was established during the British Raj. The external division began as early as 1939, with a program in Pashto for listeners in the North West Frontier Province. After independence, AIR’s Outreach Division was India’s voice for the neighborhood. It broadcast to people in neighboring countries in their own language, and helped promote Indian goodwill and interests among them.

During the 1971 Bangladesh War, AIR played an important role in informing the people of East Bengal (then East Pakistan) of everything that was happening across the country. In East Pakistan, the news was heavily falsified in favor of the Pakistani military. The real picture was broadcast from India. AIR’s external affairs division introduced a special Bengali service on April 26, 1971, following the Bangladesh liberation movement.

To mark Bangladesh’s 50th anniversary, the World Council of India has released a new book titled . It includes AIR broadcasts and commentary by the late UL Baruah when he was director of the AIR field service during the Bangladesh War of Independence. The book gives readers a glimpse not only of what happened in 1971, but also of the background and developments that led to the military crackdown by the Pakistani military. The bloodbath, including the murder of intellectuals, was recorded, and the commentary set the context for the genocide as it unfolded.

Baruah provides insight not only into what was happening in East Pakistan, but also how the international (Western) press projected it. Although Richard Nixon supported Pakistan and most of America’s allies remained silent, the Western press reported the horrors of the carnage. AIR translated these reports and broadcast them to Bengali listeners. Baruah also quotes Pakistani journalists who interviewed the military junta as well as politicians like Zulfikar Ali Bhutto.

AIR broadcasts go far beyond reporting daily events. They provide an overview of the debate in Pakistan after Sheikh Mujibur Rahman’s victory in the 1970 parliamentary elections; quotes from the Pakistani press to show the country’s internal divisions; manipulation by the army under Yahya Khan; the role played by ambitious political leaders like Bhutto, which has been used by military leaders to demand the postponement of the National Assembly; and all the machinations that ultimately led to the break-up of Pakistan.

Here is an example of Baruah’s incisive commentary in a lecture on the Pakistan Defense Day celebrations on September 6, 1971. Taking this as a fixed point, Baruah analyzes the role of the military in Pakistan: “While the soldiers Pakistanis are undoubtedly good fighters, unfortunately they got involved in Pakistani politics in a way that posed a serious threat to the rebirth of democracy in Pakistan. The power structure is such that the vested interests of the military-bureaucratic elite, supported by the newly wealthy industrial tycoons, would make any real transfer of power to the people, increasingly difficult over time.

In a special commentary on November 19, 1971, weeks before India and Pakistan went to war over Bangladesh, Baruah noted:? Muslim women have been raped, Muslim homes have been set on fire in Dhaka and other towns and villages in East Bengal. Murders of civilians have taken place even in this month of Ramzan. “

The Bangladesh Commentaries are divided into four neat chapters. The first is on “Declaring genocide”. The second deals with “Opinions in West Pakistan”. The next one is “The Debate in Pakistan after the Birth of Bangladesh”, and the last is “The Rise of Bangladesh”. The four chapters give a vivid picture of the times, including the national questions that arose in Pakistan after the humiliating defeat of the military, and recreates the world as it was in the 1970s, placing the birth of the Bangladesh in historical context.


Source link

]]>
Sarah Hall’s Burntcoat Review – Love in Containment | fiction https://naxos-audiobooks.com/sarah-halls-burntcoat-review-love-in-containment-fiction/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 06:30:00 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/sarah-halls-burntcoat-review-love-in-containment-fiction/ WWhat if the virus had been more deadly, more contagious? What if UK deaths had numbered in the millions rather than the hundreds of thousands? These are questions most of us have asked ourselves, imagining scenarios in which, as philosopher Srećko Horvat puts it in his book After the Apocalypse, Covid is a revelation of […]]]>

WWhat if the virus had been more deadly, more contagious? What if UK deaths had numbered in the millions rather than the hundreds of thousands? These are questions most of us have asked ourselves, imagining scenarios in which, as philosopher Srećko Horvat puts it in his book After the Apocalypse, Covid is a revelation of the deadly new viruses to come, fueled by the scientific experimentation and ecological collapse. Today, Sarah Hall has turned these imaginaries into a novel, both epic and miniature, the story of two lovers cut off from a world that is falling apart.

Edith is a sculptor, raised by a single mother disabled by a stroke. She overcame the fragility of her upbringing by creating large and often violent works of public art. She rose to fame with Hecky, a 40-foot witch crouching by the side of the freeway. As always with Hall, the setting combines a sense of displacement with intense specificity; Edith lives in a ‘milieu’ in Scotland where she has transformed a large warehouse called Burntcoat into a combination of home and studio. This is where she begins her love affair with Halit, an immigrant chef. Lockdown arrives and Halit moves in with her. They have the confidence of new lovers: “It didn’t seem possible that the joy was disturbed, or that our bodies could break. “

Around them, society is collapsing, plagued by disease and confinement. The virus is spreading wildly “according to ethnicity and poverty” and there are brawls in food banks and burgled stores. The government responded with more authoritarianism: the military patrolled the streets, curfews were imposed for everyone. Halit goes out to retrieve food from his old restaurant and comes home bleeding. A few days later, he develops lesions – AIDS also seems to be in the imaginative mix here – and his illness begins.

I doubt the value of dystopia in our present moment. Hall’s fictional version isn’t the virus or lockdown we’ve had, and there is a danger that we can fall further into our current dead ends if we give in to the desire to fantasize about the apocalypse. What is fascinating here, however, are Hall’s revelations about the disease and its relationship to creativity and sexuality. She may have needed to imagine a more extreme form of the virus to explore this terrain.

Hall has always written sex well and seriously, has always allowed desire to flourish even in the most unlikely of situations, but now she’s making sex the heart of the book, describing it in words: “When we parted, it was like drowning. We could only breathe with our mouths held together. Ultimately, this pandemic will bring out a puritanism in Edith, leaving her to ask as little as possible of the world. But in the meantime, Halit’s disease offers a sort of terrible but ecstatic consumption of their love. The scenes where the feverish man and the exhausted woman meet in their infected bed have an extraordinary erotic intensity; it is there too in the brutally visceral descriptions of its final decline. “He will do it for me too,” she thinks, after cleaning up her mess of bodily fluids, “and there will be nothing hidden between us.” The logic of erotic unity and the facts of the disease come together.

This terrible and ambivalent closeness takes all of Hall’s magnificent powers as a novelist to describe. I had the feeling that only she could write it. Equally powerful are his awe-inspiring descriptions of the virus itself, which Edith respects as a work of art in its own right. ” I repeat. It was – it’s – perfect, ”she wrote. “Perfectly composed, star-like and programmed for the moment of greatest chaos.” As an artist, she grapples with what to do with her fear. The question arises as to whether the demonic creativity of the virus signals the end of other forms of creativity or could spur new ones. One kind of response comes by sculpting the virus itself, as she does when tasked with making a memorial for the dead.

At the end of the book, which is also the beginning, Edith is 59 years old and preparing to die. It is a virus that kills everyone it infects; people usually don’t survive in remission for as long as she does. The book we read is therefore a reflection of a dying woman, and the memories of her mother are touchingly evoked within the framework of its elliptical structure. With those she loved most now dead, Edith turns to the virus or to death herself as a lover once the disease catches up with her; the “you” of dead Halit and the “you” of death become difficult to disentangle. “You want to test my courage,” she writes, now comparing herself to the little child who visited her mother in the hospital after her stroke, “to see the unspeakable and torn mark left by your near miss” . She is torn between the truth of the virus and the truth of her dead lover, “a tear in it all, a sudden gift of truth”. The hope in this sparse, sumptuous and brilliant book is that the work of searching for meaning and truth can continue even to the extreme, even as art and love escape.

The Group by Lara Feigel is published by John Murray. Sarah Hall’s Burntcoat is published by Faber (£ 12.99). To support the Guardian and Observer, order a copy from guardbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply.


Source link

]]>
Book Review: The Big Book of Small Python Projects: 81 Easy Practice Programs https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-the-big-book-of-small-python-projects-81-easy-practice-programs/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 11:44:58 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-the-big-book-of-small-python-projects-81-easy-practice-programs/ by Sumana Bhattacharya October 7, 2021 The book “The Big Book of Small Python Projects: 81 Easy Practice Programs” is written by Al Sweigart. It was released on June 21, 2021. Best-selling author Al Sweigart shows you how to create over 80 entertaining apps with minimal coding and maximum creativity. If you’ve learned basic Python […]]]>

by Sumana Bhattacharya
October 7, 2021

The book “The Big Book of Small Python Projects: 81 Easy Practice Programs” is written by Al Sweigart. It was released on June 21, 2021. Best-selling author Al Sweigart shows you how to create over 80 entertaining apps with minimal coding and maximum creativity. If you’ve learned basic Python syntax and are ready to start developing programs, the Big Book of Small Python Projects will be both informative and entertaining. With this collection of 81 Python projects, you’ll be able to immediately create digital art, games, animation, and more. You will practice recreating the programs and trying to add your custom keys after you understand how the code works.

These basic text-based applications contain no more than 256 lines of code. Whether it’s a retro screensaver, snail racing game, click bait title generator, or animated DNA strands, each project stands on its own so that you can simply share it online.

You will be able to hangman, blackjack and other games to play against your friends or the computer, as well as simulations of a forest fire, a million dice rolls and a Japanese abacus, animations like an aquarium virtual, rotating cube, and bouncing DVD logo screensaver, and encryption programs that use ciphers like ROT13 and Vigenère to mask text. If you are bored with traditional step-by-step tutorials, the “The Big Book of Small Python Projects” learning-by-doing method will appeal to you. It shows that great things can come in small packages.

Share this article

Share

About the Author

More info about the author


Source link

]]>
Tracing the history of India’s largest dairy company https://naxos-audiobooks.com/tracing-the-history-of-indias-largest-dairy-company/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 01:30:01 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/tracing-the-history-of-indias-largest-dairy-company/ Despite the instantaneous nature of information in the digital age in which fake news, spoofed images and videos travel across India in no time at all, many readers will be surprised that there is a world beyond. beyond Amul. Many readers of this book review will hear about the Arokya brand of milk and ice […]]]>

Despite the instantaneous nature of information in the digital age in which fake news, spoofed images and videos travel across India in no time at all, many readers will be surprised that there is a world beyond. beyond Amul. Many readers of this book review will hear about the Arokya brand of milk and ice cream for the first time.

Harish Damodaran, national editor for rural affairs and agriculture at the Indian Express, documented the story of Hatsun Agro in the book Pierced. This is the story of Hatsun Agro, India’s largest dairy company.

Harish Damodaran
Pierced
Viking penguin (August 2021)

Hatsun Agro is not a child of the information technology revolution in India. Neither is it the venture capital financing of a “start-up” which is now the subject of a craze for budding companies. Rather, it is the story of a business started by a dropout, not living in a large prosperous city. It traces the vicissitudes of a business, the generosity of some and the failure of several business ideas.

RG Chandramogan, the promoter of Hatsun Agro, was from Thiruthanga, a town in the district of Virudhunagar in Tamil Nadu. Her mind went blank while writing the chemistry paper in the pre-college exam and walked out of the exam room. He went to watch two movies in a row that night, Thangai and Maadi Veettu Mappillai.

This book is the fascinating story of someone who failed his pre-college exam, but then started a business that has now grown into a leading private sector dairy company in India. Its brands, Arun Ice Creams, Arokya milk, Hatsun Curd, Hatsun Paneer, Hatsun Ghee, Hatsun Dairy Whitener, Ibaco and Oyalo may not be known in northern and eastern India, but in the states of south, these products are widely consumed and highly regarded. These are household names in Tamil Nadu and Karnataka.

Chandramogan started his professional life in 1967 as an employee at a lumber merchant in Villupuram, 160 km south of Madras, with a monthly salary of Rs 65. His breakthrough was provided to him by an uncle who gave him the idea of ​​an ice cream factory. It was an investment of Rs 25,000, of which Rs 12,000 was a loan from the Tamilnad Mercantile Bank and Rs 13,000 came from the sale of three stores belonging to his father. It was in April 1970.

Sold in carts, Arun Ice Cream made a profit of Rs 40,000 on sales of Rs 1.15 lakh.

The rest, as they say, is history.

The book documents how Chandramogan explored new markets for Arun’s ice cream. It was IIT Madras that made Arun Ice Cream a breakthrough. Annamalai University in Chidambaram, 225 km from Madras, was the next big market. He traveled to other smaller towns in Tamil Nadu and conquered the market there. It was much later that Arun could become the best-selling brand in Chennai itself.

The book provides an interesting account of how a store owner’s request for a freezer to set up an ice cream parlor was turned down.

Management students from various business schools will find it interesting to learn how Arun competed with Kwality, Joy, and Dasprakash, all of which were well-established ice cream brands. The small steps taken in the early years to promote the Arun brand are not only interesting but also very motivating. These were innovative, inexpensive but very impactful.

In March 1986, Hatsun Foods Private Limited was incorporated. By 1990, Hatsun had become the market leader for ice cream in Tamil Nadu.

The author’s account of the switch from carts and tricycles to delivery by refrigerated trucks is interesting to read.

Equally fascinating is the story of how the company entered the dairy business. Aavin was a popular brand of the Tamil Nadu Cooperative Milk Producers’ Federation. How could a new company, a startup in today’s parlance, hope to compete with a well-established cooperative that had government backing?

This is where the book becomes captivating for the reader. The economic reforms of 1991 are hailed as precursors to India’s success in achieving high economic growth in the following years, particularly from 2004 to 2012. Being a barrier for new entrants to the milk sector from the UK. private sector. Registration with the Union government was required if the milk processing capacity exceeded 75,000 liters per day. The MMPO was only lifted in the 2002-03 Union budget. From then on, the “Arokya” milk brand took off and sales of milk generated higher turnover than the sale of ice cream.

When Arokya milk was launched in July 1995, the company’s sales were 1,800 liters per day. In 2020-2021, Hatsun Agro had twelve dairies, processing around 50 lakh liters of milk per day.

It’s pretty much the same as Amul!

The book covers all aspects of the business, from cost of production to branding to diversification. The professional help provided by the company in various aspects of the business would also be of interest to existing businesses, and not only in the dairy sector.

In this book, Harish Damodaran examined the role played by developers, his employees, salespeople, consultants and others. It is not common for a local business to compete with existing brands that have enormous acceptability. Management students will find the book engaging and useful.

In today’s business environment, private equity financing is quite readily available to those with compelling business ideas. This book is about a business enterprise in the earlier days, when the entrepreneur was largely alone.

While the credit for the White Revolution in India would undoubtedly go to the cooperatives in Gujarat, the role of private sector dairy companies like Hatsun should be appreciated as they work without any financial support from the government. Hatsun also follows the model of buying milk directly from farmers. However, it should be noted that it is the milk producers who provide milk (ten to fifteen days) on credit to Hatsun as well as the cooperatives!

We need many more books on similar topics so that the efforts of previous generations of businesses created by first generation entrepreneurs are documented for posterity.

Siraj Hussain retired as Union Agriculture Secretary. Currently, he is Visiting Principal Investigator, ICRIER.


Source link

]]>
Book review: the enigma of emigration https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-the-enigma-of-emigration/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/book-review-the-enigma-of-emigration/ Taiwanese family find themselves in Alaska searching for lost girl in hauntingly stunning piece of fiction By Bradley Winterton / Contributing Journalist This is a novel about a Taiwanese family who immigrated to the United States and ended up in Alaska. The start date is the mid-1980s, with the 10-year-old male narrator moving to the […]]]>

Taiwanese family find themselves in Alaska searching for lost girl in hauntingly stunning piece of fiction

  • By Bradley Winterton / Contributing Journalist

This is a novel about a Taiwanese family who immigrated to the United States and ended up in Alaska. The start date is the mid-1980s, with the 10-year-old male narrator moving to the United States at the age of three. The father is a plumber and moved to Alaska with his family from Michigan in search of work.

The family live 30 miles from Anchorage and drive there for all their shopping. Their life is dark, both inside their house and outside. There is no grandeur of nature in this presentation, and inside everything is “junk, just junk … piles of old blankets and twenty pound bags of rice and boxes. dusty of things we had bought on sale and never used “. Half of the things in the house were bought from the same Anchorage store.

It’s hard to say which is worse, nature or the house. Sadness is everywhere in the early chapters, from the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1986 (seen on television) to the death of a younger sister, who disappeared into the snowy landscape and was declared simply as “lost. “.

Memories of Taiwan are hardly better – a place where one couldn’t talk about history or mention certain dates, where the family briefly owned land given to them by the Japanese and then confiscated by the Nationalist Party. Chinese (KMT) after World War II.

The narrator even manages to make the stars dark: “What was so great about the puffs of dust and gas? Nothing could be further from Wordsworth’s childhood, from the “dragging clouds of glory” or from Thoreau’s Walden Pond than this.

Later, things get a little more human. Sounds in the attic make the family think that the ghost of the lost girl has returned to haunt them, but soon learn that the squirrels have taken up residence and, after blocking their means of entry, discover the dead animals in the nearby woods. . Then there’s a hideous storm, followed by a touch of domestic comedy. A major climax, however, now ensues.

It turns out that the father does indeed have the ashes of the lost girl in the glove compartment of his car. He and the narrator go to mudflats where the father plans to bury the urn, only to be sucked into the mud. They barely manage to escape, and the narrator eventually disperses his sister’s ashes in bitter temperatures under a serene moon, lamenting that inside the urn they were contained in a cellophane plastic bag. sealed with a rubber band.

What really happened to the dead child is still not revealed. What we learn instead is how the father, although he didn’t tell his family, was being sued for his role in faulty repair work.

Lin said that the puzzling title of this book, The Unpassing, could refer to the girl’s death, but also to the crossing of the oceans that is emigration. I still find it enigmatic. The novel won the 2020 Clark Fiction Prize and was a finalist for several others.

Things soon turn gloomy again, and worse. One day, a sign “Notice to stop” was stuck on their door. The father announces that they are all going on vacation, and two weeks of camping and fish and clam life follow. When they return home, they find that the locks have been changed. The father manages to break in, however, and a meal of pork bones and forest plants follows. Later, their food becomes “bordering on edible”. In addition, there is no furniture except what they took with them in their van.

The vibe of this book can be grim, even depressing, but there is something haunting about the story nonetheless. At the heart of the book’s interest is the relationship between the children – the narrator, a five-year-old younger brother, and an older sister. The lost child is also never far from their minds, and is sometimes treated as always alive and present.

There are also neighbors, the Dolans, with their two children. One day the narrator and his brother are invited there for dinner – roast chicken with baked potatoes and chocolate cake, a luxury they haven’t enjoyed for some time. They are too embarrassed to accept a bag of food that Mr. Dolan offers them, but he forces it to them anyway. However, the Dolans also suffered losses – the mother passed away some time before. No character escapes the tragedy in this novel.

An article on the internet suggests that Lin Chia-chia is reluctant to talk about the extent to which the novel is based on her own experience, but such reluctance surely suggests that it is. At the very least, she must know Alaska well because a familiarity with its flora is everywhere apparent. But then, in the acknowledgments, she thanks some people for welcoming her to Anchorage in 2004, so maybe her familiarity is just the result of an extended visit.

The last 50 pages are fascinating and I couldn’t let go of the book until I finished it. A disappearance is already at the heart of this story, but the multiple disappearances, while only suspicious, are unexpected to say the least. In the end, only one character fails to make it back, but it would be a shame to reveal which one it is.

The Unpassing ends with the narrator returning to Taiwan, presumably on the east coast, and not feeling at home there or anywhere else. This suits the melancholy tone of the book, but can also be a commentary on the effects of migration in general.

It may be a dark book – the menacing Alaskan landscape, the cheated children, the manic mother, the ineffective father – but it’s also an intimate book, particularly notable for its insights into the psychology of the child. It also brings something surely original to the literature of Taiwanese migration to North America, and it will be a long time before I either forget it, or shake off the strange hold it has had in recent days. on my imagination.

Release Notes

THE PASSER

By Chia-chia Lin

289 pages

Picador

Paperback: United States

Comments will be moderated. Keep comments relevant to the article. Comments containing abusive and obscene language, personal attacks of any kind or promotion will be removed and the user banned. The final decision will be at the discretion of the Taipei Times.


Source link

]]>
Resident Physician’s Book Review published in a renowned journal of child psychiatry – Jagwire https://naxos-audiobooks.com/resident-physicians-book-review-published-in-a-renowned-journal-of-child-psychiatry-jagwire/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 19:16:03 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/resident-physicians-book-review-published-in-a-renowned-journal-of-child-psychiatry-jagwire/ Dr. Dennis Dorf, fourth-year medical resident in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Program at the Medical College of Georgia, recently published the review of his children’s books in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Dorf rated Ravi’s roar by Tom Percival, a story that follows how a young boy named […]]]>

Dr. Dennis Dorf, fourth-year medical resident in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Program at the Medical College of Georgia, recently published the review of his children’s books in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Dorf rated Ravi’s roar by Tom Percival, a story that follows how a young boy named Ravi learns to channel great feelings. The book is part of Percival’s “Big Bright Feelings” picture book series, which provides a child-friendly entry point on topics related to emotional intelligence.

Dorf is proud that his review has been included in such an esteemed journal.

“The journal is part of the journal’s highly regarded Book Forum, a famous series that also helps psychiatrists, pediatricians and parents formulate a conscientious diagnosis – or create a diligent treatment plan – for a difficult patient,” said said Dorf.

“The journal helps define, understand and resolve the challenges facing children with emotional deregulation on a daily basis, through the prism of any reader of creative fiction or advocate for children. “

Dorf received his Masters of Public Health from Stony Brook University School of Medicine and his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine from the New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Read his full book review in an excerpt from the October 2021 issue of Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

As

As
Love
haha
Wow
Sad
Angry


Source link

]]>
Katie Couric banned from promoting book on CBS after landing interview with Gayle King: report https://naxos-audiobooks.com/katie-couric-banned-from-promoting-book-on-cbs-after-landing-interview-with-gayle-king-report/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 23:15:18 +0000 https://naxos-audiobooks.com/katie-couric-banned-from-promoting-book-on-cbs-after-landing-interview-with-gayle-king-report/ CBS has reportedly banned its former presenter Katie Couric from appearing on the network to promote their new book after meeting Gayle King, co-host of “CBS Mornings.” Couric made headlines in recent weeks before the release of his revealing book “Going There,” which highlights his decades-long career in broadcast journalism. Page Six alleged Monday that […]]]>

CBS has reportedly banned its former presenter Katie Couric from appearing on the network to promote their new book after meeting Gayle King, co-host of “CBS Mornings.”

Couric made headlines in recent weeks before the release of his revealing book “Going There,” which highlights his decades-long career in broadcast journalism.

Page Six alleged Monday that Couric was “banned” by CBS after “CBS News’ chefs and producers read the book,” which came after she was scheduled to appear on the network’s flagship morning show .

After her 15-year stint as co-host of “Today” on NBC, Couric joined CBS in 2006 and anchored “CBS Evening News” until 2011.

KATIE COURIC TAKES UP HER RIVAL DIANE SAWYER IN A NEW TELL-ALL BOOK: “THIS WOMAN MUST BE ARRESTED”

According to Page Six, Couric details in her book how then-CBS chief Les Moonves attempted to get her to appear on the network’s morning show amid her bad grades on the evening newscast.

“We have thought about you and what you are good at. The evening news really doesn’t give you a place to showcase your talent. “Oh, boy, here it is…” Would you be interested in going to the morning show? he said. “You’re so good at it, and they could really need your help,” “Couric recalled of her interactions with Moonves, responding,” Absolutely not… I didn’t leave the morning show that I was. Helped become number one, so could go to the morning show for third place. “

“I had come here to accomplish something, and if it didn’t work, it didn’t work. I’d rather quit the network than retire on the morning show, which at the time was a cheap knockoff of the two more, “Couric wrote.

CBS did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

In this July 16, 2006 file photo, CBS News anchor and correspondent Katie Couric answers questions about her upcoming season by anchoring “CBS Evening News with Katie Couric” at a press conference in Pasadena, California.
(PA)

Previous excerpts from her book show Couric tearing up former colleagues and rivals.

“For a minute, Ashleigh Banfield was the next big thing; I had heard her father telling anyone who listened to him that she was going to replace me. In this environment, the mentorship sometimes felt like self-sabotage,” said Couric. about his former NBC colleague according to Daily Mail report. Banfield dismissed Couric’s claims, reacting to his NewsNation show last week, “You sued my father.”

FORMER KATIE COURIC COLLEGE ASHLEIGH BANFIELD DISMISSES CLAIMS IN NEW BOOK: “YOU ARE AFTER MY FATHER”

Couric also took aim at former “Good Morning America” ​​host Diane Sawyer, admitting that she “liked” to get under her skin as the two battled to be the best star on the morning TV news.

According to the New York Post, the book describes how Couric and Sawyer fought for exclusive interviews. In one case, Couric beat up Sawyer for an interview with two teenage boys who had been kidnapped because her team pointed out that she was a widowed mother of two daughters, while Sawyer was a stepmother.

Couric also described how Sawyer infamous interview with the late famous singer Whitney Houston was almost exploitative, according to The Post, and that she used Houston’s personal problems to get good sound bites.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I wonder who she had to blow up to get that,” Couric asked of a separate interview Sawyer was able to get with a woman who gave birth to twins at the age of 57.

“I’m pretty sure I’m speaking for Diane when I say neither of us ever resorted to a real fellatio to get an interview, but we both got into the metaphorical genre – Flattering caretakers, family members and anyone who stood in the way of a big get, “Couric wrote, according to The Post.

Fox News’ Brandon Gillepsie and Cortney O’Brien contributed to this report.


Source link

]]>